Advertisement

Introduction

  • Jessica LindblomEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Cognitive Systems Monographs book series (COSMOS, volume 26)

Abstract

This introductory chapter presents the research domain, describes the aim and motivations of the research, and addresses its theoretical significance to cognitive science as well as some practical relevance to artificial intelligence and socially interactive technology. Furthermore, the research process is described, and the relationship between body, embodiment, and embodied cognition, is discussed, disentangling some misconceptions of embodiment, and describing how I view these concepts.

Keywords

Social Interaction Cognitive Science Interactive Technology Interactive Cognition Wolf Pack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Gardner, H.: The Mind’s New Science: A History of the Cognitive Revolution. Basic Books, New York (1987)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Varela, F.J., Thompson, E., Rosch, E.: The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1991)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Augoustinos, M., Walker, I.: Social Cognition-An Integrated Introduction. Sage Publications, London (1995)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fiske, S.T., Taylor, S.E.: Social Cognition. Random House, New York (1984)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kunda, Z.: Social Cognition: Making Sense of People. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1999)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Burgoon, J.K., Buller, D.B., Woodall, W.G.: Nonverbal Communication: The Unspoken Dialogue. McGraw-Hill, New York (1996)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mehrabian, A.: Nonverbal Communication. Aldine-Atherton, Chicago (1972)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Clark, A.: Being There: Putting Brain, Body, and World together Again. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1997)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Clark, A.: Embodied, situated, and distributed cognition. In: Bechtel, W., Graham, G. (eds.) A Companion to Cognitive Science, pp. 506–525. Blackwell Publishers, Malden, MA (1998)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Clark, A.: An embodied cognitive science? Trends Cogn. Sci. 3(9), 345–351 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Clark, A.: Where brain, body, and world collide. Cogn. Syst. Res. 1(1), 5–17 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Dreyfus, H.L.: What Computers Can’t Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason. (This book is contained in the extended MIT Press edition (Dreyfus, 1992) to which all page numbers refer). Harper & Row, New York (1972)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Dreyfus, H.L.: What Computers Still Can’t Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason. MIT press, Cambridge, MA (1992)Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Gibbs Jr, R.W.: Embodiment and Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA (2006)Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Hutchins, E.: Cognition in the Wild. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1995)Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Johnson, M.: The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Reason and Imagination. University of Chicago Press, Chicago (1987)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lakoff, G., Johnson, M.: Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought. Basic Books, New York (1999)Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Suchman, L.A.: Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human-Machine Communication. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1987)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Anderson, M.L.: Embodied cognition: a field guide. Artif. Intell. 149(1), 91–130 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Anderson, M.L.: How to study the mind: an introduction to embodied cognition. In: Santoianni, F., Sabatano, C. (eds.) Brain Development in Learning Environments: Embodied and Perceptual Advancements, pp. 65–82. Cambridge Scholars Press, Newcastle upon Tyne (2007)Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Wilson, M.: Six views of embodied cognition. Psychon. Bull. Rev. 9(4), 625–636 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ziemke, T.: What’s that thing called embodiment? In: Alterman, R., Kirsch, D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 1305–1310. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (2003)Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Tomasello, M.: Primate cognition: introduction to the issue. Cogn. Sci. 24(3), 351–361 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Ingold, T.: Evolving skills. In: Rose, H., Rose, S.P.R. (eds.) Alas, Poor Darwin: Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology, pp. 273–297. Harmony Books, New York (2000)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Rogoff, B.: The Cultural Nature of Human Development. Oxford University Press, New York (2003)Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Maturana, H.R., Varela, F.J.: The Tree of Knowledge: The Biological Roots of Human Understanding. Shambhala Publications, Boston (1987)Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Varela, C.R.: Harré and Merleau-Ponty: beyond the absent moving body in embodied social theory. J. Theory Soc. Behav. 24(2), 167–185 (1994)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Hendriks-Jansen, H.: Catching Ourselves in the Act: Situated Activity, Interactive Emergence, Evolution, and Human Thought. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1996)Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Wood, D., Bruner, J.S., Ross, G.: The role of tutoring in problem solving. J. Child Psychol. Psychiatry 17(2), 89–100 (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Clark, A., Chalmers, D.: The extended mind. Analysis 58:7–19 (1998)Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Susi, T., Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: Beyond the bounds of cognition. In: Alterman, R., Kirsch, D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 1134–1139. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (2003)Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Thelen, E., Smith, L.B.: A Dynamic Systems Approach to the Development of Cognition and Action. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (1994)Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Wertsch, J.V.: Mediated action. In: Bechtel, W., Graham, G. (eds.) A Companion to Cognitive Science, pp. 518–525. Blackwell Publisher, Malden, MA (1998)Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Damasio, A.: Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason and the Human Brain. Grosset, New York (1995)Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Damasio, A.: The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness. Harcourt, New York (1999)Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    Damasio, A.: Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain. Harcourt, New York (2003)Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Farnell, B.M.: Do You See what I Mean?: Plains Indian Sign Talk and the Embodiment of Action. University of Texas Press, Austin (1995)Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Farnell, B.: Moving bodies, acting selves. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 28, 341–373 (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Johnson, M., Rohrer, T.: We are live creatures: embodiment, American pragmatism and the cognitive organism. In: Ziemke,T., Zlatev, J., Frank, R.M. (eds.) Body, Language and Mind, vol. 1, Embodiment, pp. 17–54. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin (2007)Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Sheets-Johnstone, M.: The Primacy of Movement. John Benjamins Publishing Company, Amsterdam (1999)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Sheets-Johnstone, M.: Answering the challenges of animation: response to Crease’s review essay. Phenomenol. Cogn. Sci. 2, 84–93 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Barbour, I.G.: Neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and human nature: theological and philosophical reflections. Zygon 34(3), 361–398 (1999)MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Rose, H., Rose, S.: Alas Poor Darwin: Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology. Harmony Books, New York (2000)Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Segerstråle, U.C.: Sociobiology. In: Nadel, L. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, vol. 4, Similarity-Zombies, pp. 85–91. MacMillian Publishers, London (2003)Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Segerstråle, U.C., Molnár, P.: Nonverbal communication: where nature meets culture. In: Segerstråle, U., Molnár, P. (eds.) Nonverbal Communication: Crossing the Boundary between Culture and Nature, pp. 1–21. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (1997)Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Agar, M.H.: Personal communication at the advanced ethnography workshop at the Skaraborg Institute, Skövde and University of Skövde, 22 Apr 2005Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Gallagher, S.: How the Body Shapes the Mind. Oxford University Press, Oxford (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Brooks, R.A., Breazeal, C., Marjanović, M., Scassellati, B., Williamson, M.M.: The Cog project: building a humanoid robot. In: Nehaniv, C. (ed.) Computation for Metaphors, Analogy, and Agents, pp. 52–87. Springer, New York (1999)Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    Chrisley, R., Ziemke, T.: Embodiment. In: Nadel, L. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, vol. 1, Academic achievements-Environmental psychology, pp. 1102–1108. MacMillian Publishers, London (2003)Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    Dautenhahn, K., Ogden, B., Quick, T.: A framework for the study of socially embedded and interaction-aware robotic agents. Cogn. Syst. Res. 3(3), 397–428 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    Núñez, R., Freeman, W.J.: Reclaiming Cognition: The Primacy of Action Intention and Emotion. Imprint Academic, Bowling Green, OH (1999) Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    Riegler, A.: When is a cognitive system embodied? Cogn. Syst. Res. 3(3), 339–348 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. 53.
    Rohrer, T.: The body in space: dimensions of embodiment. In: Ziemke, T., Zlatev, J., Frank, R.M. (eds.) Body, Language and Mind, vol. 1, Embodiment, pp. 339–377. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin (2007)Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    Sharkey, N.E., Ziemke, T.: Mechanistic versus phenomenal embodiment: can robot embodiment lead to strong AI? Cogn. Syst. Res. 2(4), 251–262 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    Ziemke, T.: The construction of ‘reality’ in the robot: constructivist perspectives on situated artificial intelligence and adaptive robotics. Found. Sci. 6(1–3), 163–233 (2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Ziemke, T.: Are robots embodied? In: Balkenius, C., Zlatev, J., Kozima, H., Dautenhahn, K., Breazeal, C. (eds.) Proceedings of the First Conference on Epigenetic Robotics, pp. 75–83. Lund University Cognitive Science Series, LUCS, 85, Sweden, Lund (2001)Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Ziemke, T.: Introduction to the special issue on situated and embodied cognition. Cogn. Syst. Res. 3(3), 271–274 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: Social situatedness of natural and artificial intelligence: Vygotsky and beyond. Adapt. Behav. 11(2), 79–96 (2003)Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: Embodiment-in-motion: broadening the social mind. In: Bara, B.G., Barsalou, L., Bucciarelli, M. (eds.) Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 1284–1289. Lawrence Earlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (2005)Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: The body-in-motion and social scaffolding: implications for human and android cognitive development. In: 27th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, in the Workshop: Toward Social Mechanisms of Android Science, Stresa, Italy, pp. 87–95 (2005)Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: Embodiment and social interaction: implications for cognitive science. In: Ziemke, T., Zlatev, J., Frank, R.M. (eds.) Body, Language and Mind, vol. 1, Embodiment, pp. 129–162. Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin (2007)Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Semin, G.R., Smith, E.R.: Interfaces of social psychology with situated and embodied cognition. Cogn. Syst. Res. 3(3), 385–396 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    Sinha, C., De Lopez, K.J.: Language, culture, and the embodiment of spatial cognition. Cogn. Linguist. 11(1/2), 17–42 (2000)Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Alač, M.: From trash to treasure: learning about brain images through multimodality. Semiotica 156(1/4), 177–202 (2005)Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    Alač, M.: Widening the wideware: an analysis of multimodal interaction in scientific practice. In: Bara, B.G., Barsalou, L., Bucciarelli, M. (eds.) The 27th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 85–90. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (2005)Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Alač, M., Hutchins, E.: I see what you are saying: action as cognition in fMRI brain mapping practice. J. Cogn. Cult. 4(3–4), 3–4 (2004)Google Scholar
  67. 67.
    Hutchins, E.: Imagining the cognitive life of things. In: Workshop on The cognitive life of things: Recasting the boundaries of the mind (2006)Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: Social situatedness: Vygotsky and beyond. In: Prince, C.G., Demiris, Y., Marom, Y., Kozima, H., Balkenius, C. (eds.) Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Epigenetic Robotics: Modelling Cognitive Development in Robotic Systems, pp. 71–78. Lund University Cognitive Studies, LUCS 94, Sweden, Lund (2006)Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Lindblom, J., Ziemke, T.: The social body in motion: cognitive development in infants and androids. Connect. Sci. 18(4), 333–346 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    Ziemke, T., Lindblom, J.: Some methodological issues in android science. Interact. Stud. 7(3), 339–342 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. 71.
    Ishiguro, H.: Android science: conscious and subconscious recognition. Connect. Sci. 18(4), 319–332 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. 72.
    Kozima, H.: Infanoid: an experimental tool for developmental psycho-robotics. In: International Workshop on Developmental Study, Tokyo (2000)Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Kozima, H., Yano, H.: A robotogenetic model of human social development. In: International Workshop on the Relationship between Cognitive and Linguistic Development (2001)Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    MacDorman, K.F., Ishiguro, H.: The study of interaction through the development of androids. In: Computer Vision and Image Processing Workshop. SIG Technical Reports 2004-CVIM-146, pp. 69–75. Information Processing Society of Japan, Tokyo (2004)Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    Breazeal, C.: Designing Sociable Robots. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (2002)Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Fong, T., Nourbakhsh, I.: Socially interactive robots. Robot. Auton. Syst. 42(3), 139–141 (2003)zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    Fong, T., Nourbakhsh, I., Dautenhahn, K.: A survey of socially interactive robots. Robot. Auton. Syst. 42(3), 143–166 (2003)zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. 78.
    Ackerman, M.S.: The intellectual challenge of CSCW: the gap between social requirements and technical feasibility. Human Comput. Interact. 15(2–3), 179–203 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. 79.
    Erickson, T., Kellogg, W.A.: Social translucence: an approach to designing systems that support social processes. In: Carroll, J.M. (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction in the New Millennium, pp. 325–345. Addison-Wesley Professional, New York (2002)Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    Crick, F., Koch, C.: A framework for consciousness. Nat. Neurosci. 6(2), 119–126 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. 81.
    Mead, G.H.: Mind, Self, and Society. University of Chicago Press, Chicago (1934)Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    Shanker, S.G., King, B.J.: The emergence of a new paradigm in ape language research: beyond interactionism. Behav. Brain Sci. 25(05), 605–656 (2002)Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    Tomasello, M.: The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (1999)Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    Vygotsky, L.S.: Mind in Society. The Development of Higher Psychological Processes (Originally published in Russian 1934). Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (1978)Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    Dewey, J.: The reflex arc concept in psychology. Psychol. Rev. 3(4), 357–370 (1896)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    Goldin-Meadow, S.: Hearing Gesture: How Our Hands Help Us Think. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA (2003)Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    Goodwin, C.: Action and embodiment within situated human interaction. J. Pragmat. 32(10), 1489–1522 (2000)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    McNeill, D.: Hand and Mind: What Gestures Reveal about Thought. University of Chicago Press, Chicago (1992)Google Scholar
  89. 89.
    McNeill, D.: Gesture and Thought. University of Chicago Press, Chicago (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. 90.
    Merleau-Ponty, M.: The Structure of Behaviour (Originally published in French 1942). Beacon Press, Boston (1963)Google Scholar
  91. 91.
    Piaget, J.: The Construction of Reality in the Child (Originally published in French 1937). Basic Books, New York (1954)Google Scholar
  92. 92.
    Rizzolatti, G.: The mirror neuron system and its function in humans. Anat. Embryol. 210(5), 419–421 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. 93.
    Uexküll, J.v.: A stroll through the worlds of animals and men: a picture book of invisible worlds (Originally published in German 1934). Semiotica 89(4), 319–391 (1957)Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    Denzin, N.K., Lincoln, Y.S.: Introduction: the discipline and practice of qualitative research. In: Denzin, N.K., Lincoln, Y.S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research, 2nd edn, pp. 1–28. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CL (2000)Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    Lindblom, J.: Embodied action as a helping hand in social interaction. In: Sun, R., Miyake, N. (eds.) Proceedings of the 28th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 477–482. Lawrence Earlbaum, Mahwah, NJ (2006)Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    Chiel, H.J., Beer, R.D.: The brain has a body: adaptive behavior emerges from interactions of nervous system, body and environment. Trends Neurosci. 20(12), 553–557 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. 97.
    Morris, D.: Animals and humans, thinking and nature. Phenomenol. Cogn. Sci. 4(1), 49–72 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    Pert, C.B.: Molecules of Emotion: Why you Feel the Way You Feel. Simon and Schuster, London (1997)Google Scholar
  99. 99.
    Greenfield, P.M.: The mutual definition of culture and biology in development. In: Keller, H., Poortinga, Y.H., Schölmerich, A. (eds.) Between Culture and Biology: Perspectives on Ontogenetic Development, pp. 57–76. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. 100.
    Gislén, A., Warrant, E.J., Dacke, M., Kröger, R.H.: Visual training improves underwater vision in children. Vision Res. 46(20), 3443–3450 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. 101.
    Kendon, A.: Conducting Interaction: Patterns of Behavior in Focused Encounters. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, MA (1990)Google Scholar
  102. 102.
    Gallagher, S.: Simulation trouble. Soc. Neurosci. 2(3–4), 353–365 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. 103.
    Lakoff, G., Núñez, R.E.: Where Mathematics Comes From: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being. Basic books, New York (2000)Google Scholar
  104. 104.
    Shilling, C.: The Body in Culture, Technology and Society. Sage publications, London (2004)Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    Stam, H.J.: The Body and Psychology. Sage Publications, London (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of InformaticsUniversity of SkövdeSkövdeSweden

Personalised recommendations