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CogInfoCom-Driven Research Areas

  • Péter Baranyi
  • Adam Csapo
  • Gyula Sallai
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, an overview is provided of the research areas of CogInfoCom channels, speechability and socio-cognitive ICT—all three of which have recently emerged under CogInfoCom (further recent initiatives are presented in the following chapter). CogInfoCom channels focus on how multi-sensory messages between cognitive entities can be structured in such a way that semantic meaning can be effectively interpreted; while speechability and socio-cognitive ICT address various aspects of linguistic and social tangleactions in geographically and temporally distributed cognitive networks. The second half of the chapter briefly presents research efforts and results that are representative of these areas and have appeared at CogInfoCom conferences and special issues.

Keywords

Semantic Meaning Cognitive Network Cognitive Capability Contextual Approach Semantic Label 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Péter Baranyi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Adam Csapo
    • 2
    • 1
  • Gyula Sallai
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Széchenyi István University GyőrBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Institute for Computer Science and Control of the Hungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary
  3. 3.Budapest University of Technology and EconomicsBudapestHungary
  4. 4.Future Internet Research Coordination CentreUniversity of DebrecenDebrecenHungary

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