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Polycomb Proteins and their Roles in Skin Development and Regeneration

  • Katherine L. Dauber-Decker
  • Idan Cohen
  • Elena EzhkovaEmail author
Chapter
  • 392 Downloads
Part of the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine book series (STEMCELL)

Abstract

Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC) are essential chromatin regulators that control tissue development and stem cells. While studies have revealed the functions of Polycomb proteins in embryonic stem cells and mammalian tissues, the exact mechanisms of Polycomb function largely remain to be elucidated. Here, we will discuss evidence of the essential roles of Polycomb proteins in the skin, including their roles in the control of development, wound healing and regeneration, as well as in triggering common skin diseases, including cancer and psoriasis.

Keywords

Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC1) PRC1 Complexes Embryonic SC (ESCs) Merkel Cell Epidermal Differentiation Genes 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

BCC

Basal cell carcinoma

cKO

conditional knockout

E

embryonic

EC-SC

Epidermal cancer stem cell

EDC

Epidermal Differentiation Complex

ESC

Embryonic stem cell

H2AK119ub1

histone H2A monoubiquitylation of K119

H3K27me3

trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine (K) 27

HF-SC

Hair follicle stem cells

KO

knockout

Krt

Cytokeratin

MCC

Merkel cell carcinoma

Mx

Matrix

ORS

Outer root sheath

P

Postnatal

PcG

Polycomb group

PRC

Polycomb repressive complex

RNAPII-S2P

RNAPII phosphorylated on Serine 2

SC

Stem cell

SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma

Notes

Acknowledgments

Katherine L. Dauber-Decker was a trainee of the NIDCR-Interdisciplinary Training Program in Systems and Developmental Biology and Birth Defects T32HD075735. Elena Ezhkova is supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers R01 AR063724 and R01 AR069078. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine L. Dauber-Decker
    • 1
  • Idan Cohen
    • 1
  • Elena Ezhkova
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Cell, Developmental, and Regenerative Biology, Black Family Stem Cell InstituteIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA

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