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Ancient Views on the Quality of Life

  • Alex C. MichalosEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Well-Being and Quality of Life Research book series (BRIEFSWELLBEING)

Abstract

While the quantity of our lives is notoriously limited to one per person, its quality is as varied as the perspectives or domains from which it is viewed. Viewed from one perspective, a person may be well off, but from another not at all well off. This fact of life is familiar to everyone. So, the whole research field of ‘quality of life’ studies might be more accurately called ‘qualities of life’ studies. In any case, the general sense of the phrase ‘quality of life’ is here understood as a good life all things considered.

Keywords

Good Life Moral Virtue Nicomachean Ethic Happy Life External Good 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of Northern British ColumbiaPrince GeorgeCanada
  2. 2.OttawaCanada

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