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How the Human Body Works: From Quarks to Cells

  • H. G. StratmannEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Science and Fiction book series (SCIFICT)

Abstract

Science fiction is created by and for human beings. By definition it sets characters in times, places, and situations that subtly or overtly involve scientific principles. A science fiction work might take place in Earth’s future, such as with the Star Trek universe. It may occur on worlds other than our own, as near as the Mars of Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles stories or as remote as the intergalactic regions of E. E. “Doc” Smith’s classic “Lensman” series. Or it could present science-based ideas and challenges in a contemporary (at least for a particular time) setting, like in early television series such as Science Fiction Theatre (1955–1957) or The Outer Limits (1963–1965). As a genre science fiction helps expands our conception of what reality is and humanity’s place in the universe.

Keywords

Mitral Valve Tricuspid Valve Science Fiction Life Process Terrestrial Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringfieldUSA

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