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The Treaty Canopy: International Law Covering Forests

  • Anja Eikermann
Chapter
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Abstract

Chapter  3 introduced the fragmentation of the international political forest processes and their failure to provide for an international law directly tailored to forests. Due to the apparent lack of an explicit, overall recognition of a common interest with regard to forests, international law is unable to access the regulation of forests directly. Nevertheless, with the realization of the failure of a legalization of forest issues, a variety of international treaties—respectively their representing treaty bodies—seized this opportunity to fill the void and bring the mandate for forests under their own aegis.

Keywords

Clean Development Mechanism Kyoto Protocol World Heritage Clean Development Mechanism Project United Nations Framework Convention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anja Eikermann
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of LawGeorg-August-University GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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