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Current and Emerging Role of Chemotherapy in Oral Cancer

  • Potjana Jitawatanarat
  • Yujie Zhao
  • Vijay Patil
  • Amit Joshi
  • Vanita Noronha
  • Kumar PrabhashEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The role of chemotherapy in oral cancer has been evolving [1]. In addition to palliation, it also has an established role in curative management [2]. It can be offered as a single modality treatment for palliation, in combination with concomitant radiation therapy (chemoradiation) as either adjuvant therapy following surgical resection or primary definitive treatment for locally advanced disease, or as induction therapy prior to definitive treatment. Unlike surgery, chemotherapy usually exerts its cytotoxic activity systemically; therefore it is often associated with side effects caused by toxicities to the normal tissues. The toxicities and cellular resistance to chemotherapy are two major obstacles to the clinical efficacy of chemotherapy [3]. Recent advances in understanding molecular biology of HNSCC have opened many new research directions. In addition to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, novel targeted therapy has demonstrated its efficacy in palliation [4]. Although most of the studies of chemotherapy in HNSCC were not site specific, many of the findings may be applicable to oral cancers.

Keywords

Oral Cancer Induction Chemotherapy Concomitant Chemotherapy Concurrent Chemoradiation Metronomic Chemotherapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Potjana Jitawatanarat
    • 1
  • Yujie Zhao
    • 3
  • Vijay Patil
    • 2
  • Amit Joshi
    • 2
  • Vanita Noronha
    • 2
  • Kumar Prabhash
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Hematology and OncologyRoswell Park Cancer InstituteBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical OncologyTata Memorial HospitalMumbaiIndia
  3. 3.Roswell Park Cancer InstituteBuffaloUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medical OncologyTata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (TBC)MumbaiIndia

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