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The Influence of the Chemical Composition of Food Packaging Materials on the Technological Suitability: A Matter of Food Safety and Hygiene

  • Salvatore ParisiEmail author
  • Caterina Barone
  • Giorgia Caruso
Chapter
  • 1.8k Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Molecular Science book series (BRIEFSMOLECULAR)

Abstract

Normally, the so-called Declaration of Food Contact Compliance is one of the most known and debated argumentations with reference to food packaging materials. This topic has been extensively discussed in the last years. However, another aspect remains to be shown and critically analysed: the ‘technological suitability’ for food applications. By the viewpoint of the European Legislator, this concept is the second requirement for the safe and legal use of food containers. On the other hand, the definition of technological suitability is not available in existing official norms or in most known food quality standards, while a specific statement has been recently made in the scientific literature. Secondly, technological suitability should be necessarily linked and influenced by different and known factors: the chemical composition of the food container or food contact material; the technological classification of the container; the chemical profile of the packaged food; the production and packaging process; and the problem of correct storage procedures for food packaging materials and packaged products. This work would show several practical applications with reference to the connection between the chemical composition of food packaging materials and the predictable behaviour of the container in ‘normal conditions’.

Keywords

Chemical risk Declaration of compliance Food hygiene Food packaging Packaging failures Technological suitability 

Abbreviations

BRC

British Retail Consortium

BADGE

Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether

BFDGE

Bisphenol F diglycidyl ether

DEHP

Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate

BSI

British Standards Institution

CAS

Chemical Abstract Service

DoC

Declaration of Food Contact Compliance

DPB

Dibutyl phthalate

DIBP

Diisobutyl phthalate

DIPN

Diisopropyl naphthalene

FRF

Fat consumption reduction factor

FWA

Fluorescent whitening agent

FQMS

Food quality management system

FPP

Food packaging producer

FPM

Food packaging material

FP

Food producer

FQMS

Food quality management system

EU

European Union

GSFS

Global Standard for Food Safety

GMP

Good manufacturing practices

HACCP

Hazard analysis and critical control points

IoP

Institute of Packaging

IFP

Integrated food product

IFS

International Featured Standards

ITX

2-Isopropyl thioxantone

MOSH

Mineral oil saturated hydrocarbon

MOAH

Mineral oil aromatic hydrocarbon

NOGE

Novolac glycidyl ether

OML

Overall migration limit

PCP

2,3,4,5,6-Pentachlorophenol

PCB

Polychlorobyphenyl

PAH

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

PAA

Primary aromatic amine

PAS

Publicly Available Standard

SVOC

Semivolatile organic compound

SML

Specific migration limit

USA

United States of America

VOC

Volatile organic compound

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salvatore Parisi
    • 1
    Email author
  • Caterina Barone
    • 2
  • Giorgia Caruso
    • 3
  1. 1.Industrial ConsultantPalermoItaly
  2. 2.ENFAP Comitato Regionale SiciliaPalermoItaly
  3. 3.Industrial ConsultantPalermoItaly

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