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Designing and Testing a Racing Car Serious Game Module

  • Babatunde Adejumobi
  • Nathan Franck
  • Michael Janzen
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8778)

Abstract

We present a serious game module to insert into an entertainment video game and examine if knowledge and skills gained from the module can transfer into real life usage. The module consists of a map of a post secondary educational institute based on the real life layout. 21 people participated in a physical scavenger hunt around the institute (3 participants in a pilot study and 18 in a second study), where some played the video game prior to the scavenger hunt. The pilot study shows a large decrease in the time required to complete the scavenger hunt by those who first played the video game. A second study showed no statistically significant difference in the average time to complete the scavenger hunt by those who first played the video game; the results suggest an effect but are limited by large variation in the individual completion times in the scavenger hunt. The limitations of the study are discussed.

Keywords

serious game modules virtual skills transfer racing game 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Babatunde Adejumobi
    • 1
  • Nathan Franck
    • 1
  • Michael Janzen
    • 1
  1. 1.The King’s UniversityEdmontonCanada

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