Advertisement

Teaching English Phonetics with a Learner Response System

  • Małgorzata Baran-ŁucarzEmail author
  • Ewa Czajka
  • Walcir Cardoso
Chapter
Part of the Second Language Learning and Teaching book series (SLLT)

Abstract

Learner Response Systems (or clickers) have existed for over four decades (Judson & Sawada, 2002); however, only recently have they received careful consideration as tools to promote learning, particularly in large classrooms (Caldwell, 2007). Surprisingly, clickers are rarely used in the L2 classroom and, more surprisingly, the topic has not received careful attention from the L2 research community (Cardoso, 2011, 2013). This paper reports the results of an experimental study following a pretest–posttest design which aimed to examine (1) the effectiveness of teaching L2 English phonetics with clickers, and (2) the perceptions of Polish students towards the use of clickers in phonetics teaching. Fifty-six English majors studying at the University of Wrocław (Poland) participated in the study. While one group was taught the rules governing English lexical stress and differences between RP and GA with the use of clickers (Clicker Group), the other was presented the same content through PowerPoint (No-Clicker Group). The quantitative analysis of the data showed that in two cases (competence and recognition of RP/GA accents) the differences in progress made by the two groups were statistically significant. Moreover, the Clicker Group outperformed the No-Clicker Group in all but one of the tests included in the study. Regarding the learners’ perception of the use of clickers in phonetics classes, the qualitative data (obtained via written open questions, questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, and class observations) revealed that learners perceive the technology as beneficial, as it provides an anxiety-free, interesting, exciting learning experience. Notably, it encourages involvement and active participation in the class, thus leading to better retention of the material. Despite the observed weaknesses (e.g., lack of personalized feedback), most participants stated that they would like clickers to be used systematically in their phonetics and other classes.

Keywords

Short Message Service General American Lexical Stress Class Observation Audience Response System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Agbatogun, A. O. (2011). Nigerian teachers’ integration of personal response system into ESL classroom. International Journal of Education, 3(2).Google Scholar
  2. Barnett, J. (2006). Implementation of personal response units in very large lecture classes: Student perceptions. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 22(4), 474-494.Google Scholar
  3. Blodgett, D. L. (2006). The effects of implementing an interactive student response system in a college algebra classroom. MSc Thesis, University of Maine.Google Scholar
  4. Blood, E., & Gulchak, D. (2013). Embedding “Clickers” into classroom instruction: Benefits and strategies. Intervention in School and Clinic, 48(4), 246-253.Google Scholar
  5. Caldwell, J. E. (2007). Clickers in the large classroom: Current research and best-practice tips. Life Sciences Education, 6(1), 9-20.Google Scholar
  6. Bristol, T. J. (2011). Clickers: Audience response strategies. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 6(4), 192-195.Google Scholar
  7. Cardoso, W. (2011). Learning a foreign language with a learner response system: The students’ perspective. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(5), 1-25.Google Scholar
  8. Cardoso, W. (2013). Learner response systems in second language teaching. In C. Chapelle (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics (pp. 3250-3256). Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  9. Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D., & Goodwin, J. (1996). Teaching pronunciation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Ciszewski, T. (2004). Transcription games (workshop). In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Materiały z konferencji ‘Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego w Polsce.’ Mikorzyn k. Konina 10-12 maja 2004r. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie (pp. 35-36). Konin: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie.Google Scholar
  11. Clark, R. E. (1983). Reconsidering research on learning from media. Review of Educational Research, 53, 445-459.Google Scholar
  12. Cutrim Schmid, E. (2007). Enhancing performance knowledge and self-esteem in classroom language learning: The potential of the ACTIVote system component of interactive whiteboard technology. System, 35, 119-133.Google Scholar
  13. Cutrim Schmid, E. (2008). Using a voting system in conjunction with interactive whiteboard technology to enhance learning in the English language classroom. Computers and Education, 50, 338-356.Google Scholar
  14. Dłutek, A. (2002). Aktywizacja młodzieży w procesie nauczania fonetyki. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia II. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku (pp. 149-160). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  15. Doughty, C. (2001). Cognitive underpinnings of focus on form. In P. Robinson (Ed.), Cognition and second language instruction (pp. 206-57). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Ellis, R. (2009). Corrective feedback and teacher development. L2 Journal, 1(1), 3-18.Google Scholar
  17. Fagen, A., Crouch, C., & Mazur, E. (2002). Peer instruction: results from a range of classrooms. The Physics Teacher, 40(4), 206-209. Google Scholar
  18. Ferlacka, W. (2006). How can e-readers stimulate phonological development? In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia VIII. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku. Proceedings of the Soczewka Conference on teaching foreign pronunciation (pp. 61-72). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  19. Fies, C., & Marshall, J. (2006). Classroom response systems: A review of the literature. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 15(1), 101-109.Google Scholar
  20. Giridharan, B. (2013). Exploring the use of ARS-keypad technology in English vocabulary development. Arab World English Journal, 4(2), 93-105.Google Scholar
  21. Gonet, W. (2004). Seven deadly sins in teaching English phonetics. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Materiały z konferencji ‘Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego w Polsce.’ Mikorzyn k. Konina 10-12 maja 2004r. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie, (pp. 44-55). Konin: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie.Google Scholar
  22. Hartmann, W. (2012). Teaching musical acoustics with clickers. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132(3), 1922.Google Scholar
  23. Johnson, E. (2010). Clicking in the foreign language classroom: Exploring effects of a novel source of explicit feedback. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
  24. Judson, E., & Sawada, D. (2002). Learning from past and present: Electronic response systems in college lecture halls. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 21, 167-181.Google Scholar
  25. Kaleta, R., & Joosten, T. (2007). Student response systems: A University of Wisconsin study of clickers. Research Bulletin 6. Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research.Google Scholar
  26. Liu, J., & Hansen, J. (2002). Peer response in second language writing classrooms. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  27. Mazur, E. (1997). Peer instruction: A user’s manual. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  28. Morley, J. (1994). A multidimensional curriculum design for speech –pronunciation. In J. Morley (Ed.), Pronunciation pedagogy and theory. New views, new directions (pp. 64-91). Alexandria, Va: TESOL. Google Scholar
  29. Murphy, T., & Jacobs, G. M. (2000). Encouraging critical collaborative autonomy. JALT Journal, 22, 228-244.Google Scholar
  30. Oigara, J., & Keengwe, J. (2013). Students’ perceptions of clickers as an instructional tool to promote active learning. Education and Information Technologies, 18(1), 15-28.Google Scholar
  31. Philp, J., Adams, R., & Iwashita, N. (2013). Peer interaction and second language learning. New York: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  32. Pośpieszyńska, M., & Wolski, B. (2002). Teaching English phonetics in the Institute of Neophilology, State Vocational College Konin. A few practical ideas. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia II. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku. Proceedings of the Soczewka Conference on teaching foreign pronunciatio (pp. 185-198). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  33. Serafini, E. J. (2013). Learner perceptions of clickers as a source of feedback in the classroom. In K. McDonough, & E. Mackey (Eds.), Second language interaction in diverse educational contexts (pp. 209-224). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  34. Sobkowiak, W. (1996). English phonetics for Poles. Poznań: Wydawnictwo Ponańskie.Google Scholar
  35. Sobkowiak, W. (2003). Materiały ulotne jako źródło metakompetencji fonetycznej (Raising phonetic awareness through trivia). In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia V. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku (pp. 151-166). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  36. Stasiak, S., & Szpyra-Kozłowska, J. (2003). Atrakcyjność a efektywność technik nauczania wymowy. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia V. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku (pp. 167-180). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  37. Stewart, S., & Stewart, W. (2013). Taking clickers to the next level: A contingent teaching model. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 44(8), 1093-1106.Google Scholar
  38. Szpyra-Kozłowska, J., Frankiewicz, J., & Święciński, R. (2006). The language laboratory and modern pronunciation pedagogy. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia VIII. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku (pp. 285-304). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  39. Szpyra-Kozłowska, J. (2012). Mispronounced lexical items in Polish English of advanced learners. Research in Language, 10(2), 243-256.Google Scholar
  40. Wrembel, M. (2002). New perspectives on pronunciation teaching. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia II. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku (pp. 173-184). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar
  41. Wrembel, M. (2004). Beyond ‘listen and repeat’ – an overview of English pronunciation teaching materials. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Materiały z konferencji ‘Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego w Polsce.’ Mikorzyn k. Konina 10-12 maja 2004r. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie (pp. 171-180). Konin: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Koninie.Google Scholar
  42. Zawadzka, T. (2002). Warm-ups, games and activities using phonemic script. In W. Sobkowiak, & E. Waniek-Klimczak (Eds.), Dydaktyka fonetyki języka obcego. Neofilologia II. Zeszyty Naukowe Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku, (pp. 199-210). Płock: Wydawnictwo Państwowej Wyższej Szkoły Zawodowej w Płocku.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Małgorzata Baran-Łucarz
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ewa Czajka
    • 1
  • Walcir Cardoso
    • 2
  1. 1.Wroclaw UniversityWroclawPoland
  2. 2.Concordia UniversityMontrealCanada

Personalised recommendations