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Measuring Competencies in Higher Education. The Case of Innovation Competence

  • Llanos CuencaEmail author
  • Marta Fernández-Diego
  • MariLuz Gordo
  • Leonor Ruiz
  • M. M. E. Alemany
  • Angel Ortiz
Chapter
Part of the Innovation, Technology, and Knowledge Management book series (ITKM)

Abstract

Within the context of permanent change, innovation has become a vital value for the survival and development of the organisations. The development of this increasingly important value will help students to gain access to the labour market and to adapt to their future jobs in accordance with these characteristics. Competency describes what training participants should be able to do at the end of such training. Competency is acquired through the various learning objectives to be achieved. Innovation competency is closely related to Self-assessment and the learning methods, Ability to work in interactive communication situations, Ability to create and maintain connections work, Ability to cooperate in a multidisciplinary and multicultural environment and Ability to communicate and interact in an international environment, etc. In this chapter, we develop a method for measuring the innovation competencies in higher education by introducing different levels of mastery.

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research has been carried out under the project of innovation and educational improvement (PIME/2013/A/016/B) ‘RECICRE—Rubrics for the Assessment of Innovation, Creativity and Enterprising Competence’ funded by the Universitat Politècnica de València and the School of Computer Science.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Llanos Cuenca
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marta Fernández-Diego
    • 1
  • MariLuz Gordo
    • 1
  • Leonor Ruiz
    • 1
  • M. M. E. Alemany
    • 1
  • Angel Ortiz
    • 1
  1. 1.Organización de EmpresasUniversitat Politècnica de ValènciaValenciaSpain

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