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Genetic Resources and Biodiversity Conservation in Nigeria Through Biotechnology Approaches

  • Justin U. OgbuEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Sustainable Development and Biodiversity book series (SDEB, volume 4)

Abstract

The chapter presented a treatise on plant genetic resources (PGR) and biodiversity conservation in Nigeria vis-a-vis the relevance of biotechnological approaches. It showed synopsis of plant resources base of the world at global and Tropical African perspectives, and the shrinking diversity of present day agroecosystems. Attempts were made to review floristic and economic crops diversity of the country as well as the concerns for the current spiral depletion and loss of vital national plant genetic resources. Biotechnology has been recognized as a versatile tool for biodiversity conservation, management and use. It offers range of applications to improve the understanding and management of genetic resources for food and agriculture. It has been proven that modern biotechnologies can help to counteract trends of genetic erosion in all food and agriculture sectors. Biotechnology procedures in conservation and management of PGR were clearly discussed, while institutional framework for conservation of national PGR was highlighted.

Keywords

Conservation biotechnology Extinction Genetic resources Nigeria Plant diversity 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Horticulture and Landscape TechnologyFederal College of Agriculture (FCA)IshiaguNigeria

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