Advertisement

3D Articulated Registration of the Mouse Hind Limb for Bone Morphometric Analysis in Rheumatoid Arthritis

  • James M. Brown
  • Amy Naylor
  • Chris Buckley
  • Andrew Filer
  • Ela Claridge
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8545)

Abstract

We describe an automated method for building a statistical model of the mouse hind limb from micro-CT data, based on articulated registration. The model was initialised by hand-labelling the constituent bones and joints of a single sample. A coarse alignment of the entire model mesh to a sample mesh was followed by consecutive registration of individual bones and their descendants down a hierarchy. Transformation parameters for subsequent bones were constrained to a subset of vertices within a frustum projecting from a terminal joint of an already registered parent bone. Samples were segmented and transformed into a common coordinate frame, and a statistical shape model was constructed. The results of ten registered samples are presented, with a mean registration error of less than 40 μm (~ 3 voxels) for all samples. The shape variation amongst the samples was extracted by PCA to create a statistical shape model. Registration of the model to three unseen normal samples gives rise to a mean registration error of 5.84 μm, in contrast to 27.18 μm for three unseen arthritic samples. This may suggest that pathological bone shape changes in models of RA are detectable as departures from the model statistics.

Keywords

Iterative Close Point Registration Error Proximal Phalanx Iterative Close Point Active Shape Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Buckley, C.D.: Science, medicine, and the future: Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Brit. Med. J. 315, 236–238 (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Asquith, D.L., Miller, A.M., McInnes, I.B., Liew, F.Y.: Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. Eur. J. Immunol. 39, 2040–2044 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Diarra, D., Stolina, M., Polzer, K., Zwerina, J., et al.: Dickkopf-1 is a master regulator of joint remodeling. Nat. Med. 13, 156–163 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cootes, T.F., Taylor, C.J., Cooper, D.H., Graham, J., et al.: Active shape models - their training and application. Comput. Vis. Image Und. 6, 38–59 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Yang, Y.: Shape modelling of bones: application to the primate shoulder. Ph.D thesis, Imperial College London, UK (2008)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kainmueller, D., Lamecker, H., Zachow, S., Hege, H.C.: An articulated statistical shape model for accurate hip Joint Segmentation. In: IEEE EMB-M, pp. 6345–6351 (2009)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Saha, P.K., Liang, G., Elkins, J.M., Coimbra, A., Duong, L.T., Williams, D.S., Sonka, M.: A New Osteophyte Segmentation Algorithm using Partial Shape Model and its Applications to Rabbit Femur Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection via Micro-CT Imaging. IEEE T. Bio-Med. Eng. 55, 2212–2227 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Monach, P.A., Mathis, D., Benoist, C.: The K/BxN Arthritis Model. Curr. Protoc. Immunol. 81, 15:22.1–15:22.12 (2008)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Garland, M., Heckbert, P.S.: Surface simplification using quadric error metrics. In: SIGGRAPH, pp. 209–216 (1997)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Baiker, M., Milles, J., Vossepoel, A.M., Que, I., Kaijzel, E.L., Lowik, C., Reiber, J.H.C., Dijkstra, J., Lelieveldt, B.P.F.: Fully automated whole-body registration in mice using an articulated skeleton atlas. In: IEEE ISBI: From Nano to Macro, pp. 728–731 (2007)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Brown
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Amy Naylor
    • 3
  • Chris Buckley
    • 3
  • Andrew Filer
    • 3
  • Ela Claridge
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.PSIBS Doctoral Training CentreUniversity of BirminghamUK
  2. 2.School of Computer ScienceUniversity of BirminghamUK
  3. 3.Rheumatology Research Group, School of Immunity and InfectionUniversity of BirminghamUK

Personalised recommendations