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How Do Majority Communities View the Potential Costs of Policing Terrorism?

  • Tal Jonathan-Zamir
  • David Weisburd
  • Badi Hasisi
Chapter
  • 586 Downloads

Abstract

How do majority communities in Israel perceive the potential, unintended outcomes of policing terrorism? It is often assumed that these citizens desire and support harsh responses to terrorism threats. But at the same time, do they also consider the costs? In this chapter we address these question using survey data and in-depth interviews with non-Ultra-Orthodox Jewish citizens. These data indicate that generally, majority communities in Israel are aware of and consider at least some negative outcomes of extensive police investment in counterterrorism. Many believe that policing terrorism negatively affects the relationship between the Israeli police and the public, particularly with Arab citizens. Respondents also expressed strong agreement with the notion that policing terrorism in Israel comes at the expense of other police responsibilities such as fighting crime and enforcing traffic regulations. Moreover, many hold that counterterrorism is often used by the police as an excuse for weak performance in fighting crime.

Keywords

Property Crime Security Threat Terror Attack Terrorism Threat Police Legitimacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tal Jonathan-Zamir
    • 1
  • David Weisburd
    • 1
    • 2
  • Badi Hasisi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Criminology, Faculty of LawHebrew University of Jerusalem Mount ScopusJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Criminology, Law and SocietyGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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