Advertisement

A Social-Cognitive Prediction of the Perceived Threat of Terrorism and Behavioral Responses of Terrorist Activities

  • Lisa A. Cave
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8534)

Abstract

This paper applies a social-cognitive model to the situation in Israel following the second intifada. In the model cognitive and social-contextual factors directly influence behavioral responses to terrorism as well as indirectly through affective factors. The findings suggest that the perceived risk of a terrorist attack influenced both preparedness and anxiety and concern. However, in some cases the influence of anxiety and concern on behavioral responses was greater than the cognitive or social-contextual factors i.e. gas mask preparedness. In other cases, the Iranian nuclear threat, the perceived risk did not influence the level of preparedness indirectly through anxiety and concern. The divergence in these findings reflects overconfidence in the state’s ability to cope with the nuclear threat and the hypothetical nature of the responses.

Keywords

risk perception social-cognition terrorism 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Paton, D., Smith, L., Johnston, D.: When Good Intentions turn bad: Promoting natural hazard preparedness. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 20, 25–30 (2005)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lee, J., Lemyre, L.: A Social-Cognitive Perspective of Terrorism Risk Perception and Individual Response in Canada. Risk Analysis 29, 1265–1280 (2009)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ben Meir, Y., Bagno-Moldavsky, O.: The Voice of the People: Israeli Public Opinion on National Security 2012. Memorandum, vol. 126. Institute for National Security Studies (2012)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Inbar, E.: How Israel Bungled the Second Lebanon War. Middle East Quarterly XIV, 57–65 (2007)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
    Ben Meir, Y., Bagno-Moldavsky, O.: Vox Populi: Trends in Israeli Public Opinion on Na-tional Security 2004-2009. Memorandum, vol. 106. Institute for National Security Studies (2010)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ministry of Foreign Affairs, http://mfa.gov.il/MFA/Pages/default.aspx
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
    Rubin, U.: “Iron Dome” vs. Grade Rockets: A Dress Rehearsal for an All-Out War? Per-spectives Paper No. 173. BESA Center (2012)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
    Goodwin, R., Willson, M., Gaines Jr., S.: Terror threat perception and its consequences in contemporary Britain. British Journal of Psychology 96, 389–406 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Huddy, L., Feldman, S., Capelos, T., Provost, C.: The consequences of terrorism: Disentan-gling the effects of personal and national threat. Political Psychology 23, 485–509 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lerner, J., Gonzalez, R., Small, D., Fischhoff, B.: Effects of fear and anger on perceived risks of terrorism: A national field experiment. Psychological Science 14, 144–150 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bergstrom, R., McCaul, K.: Perceived risk and worry: The effects of 9/11 on willingness to fly. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 34, 1846–1856 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Fischhoff, B., Bruine de Bruin, W., Perrin, W., Downs, J.: Travel Risks in a Time of Terror: Judgments and Choices. Risk Analysis 24, 1301–1309 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kobbeltved, T., Brun, W., Johnsen, B., Eid, J.: Risk as feelings or risk and feelings? A cross-lagged panel analysis. Journal of Risk Research 8, 417–437 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lee, J., Dallaire, C., Lemyre, L.: Qualitative analysis of cognitive and contextual determi-nants of Canadian’s individual response to terrorism: Towards a descriptive model. Health, Risk and Society 11, 431–450 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Paton, D., Smith, L., Johnston, D.: When good intentions turn bad: Promoting natural hazard preparedness. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 20, 25–30 (2005)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Sunstein, C.: Terrorism and probability neglect. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty 26, 121–136 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
  21. 21.
  22. 22.
    Billig, M.: Is my home my castle? Place attachment, risk perception and Religious faith. Environment and Behavior 38, 248–265 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Levav, I., Kohn, R., Billig, M.: The protective effect of religiosity under terrorism. Psychiatry: Interpersonal and Biological Processes 71, 47–59 (2008)Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Rubin, U.: “Iron Dome” vs. Grade Rockets: A Dress Rehearsal for an All-Out War? Perspectives Paper No. 173. BESA Center (2012)Google Scholar
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
  27. 27.
    Velan, B., Boyko, V., Shenhar, G., Lerner-Geva, L., Kaplan, G.: Analysis of public responses to preparedness policies: the cases of H1N1 influenza vaccination and gas mask distribution. Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 2 (2013)Google Scholar
  28. 28.
  29. 29.
    Billig, M.: Is my home my castle? Place attachment, risk perception and Religious faith. Environment and Behavior 38, 248–265 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Casakin, H., Billig, M.: Effect of Settlement Size and Religiosity on Sense of Place in Communal Settlements. Environment and Behavior 41, 821–835 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Becker, G., Rubinstein, Y.: Fear and the Response to Terrorism: An Economic Analysis, Working Paper (2011)Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Waxman, D.: Living with terror, not Living in Terror: The Impact of Chronic Terrorism on Israeli society. Perspectives on Terror 5 (2011)Google Scholar
  33. 33.

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa A. Cave
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public AffairsMorehead State UniversityMoreheadUSA

Personalised recommendations