Advertisement

VIC – An Interactive Video System for Dynamic Visualization in Web and Mobile Platforms

  • Benjamim Fonseca
  • Hugo Paredes
  • Paulo Martins
  • André Alberto
  • José Rego
  • Leonel Morgado
  • Arnaldo Santos
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8514)

Abstract

This paper presents an interactive video system that enables users to change the flow of video playback by interacting with hotspots that were predefined throughout the video streams. These hotspots are synchronized with the underlying video streams and the interactions result in smooth transitions between the preloaded targets. This approach allows the dynamic visualization of content by interacting with the hotspots and producing the consequent changes in the flow of the story. The system includes web-based and mobile video players specifically developed to deal with the interactive features, as well as a configuration tool that allows content managers to choose which pre-produced interaction possibilities will be used for a specific target audience. The interactive video solution presented herein has potential to be used as a powerful communication tool, in commercial, e-learning, accessibility and entertainment contexts.

Keywords

Video Stream Interactive Video Dynamic Visualization Configuration Tool Nonfunctional Requirement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    The Moving Picture Experts Group, http://mpeg.chiariglione.org/standards/mpeg-21 (accessed in February 20, 2014)
  2. 2.
    Apple Inc., http://www.apple.com/quicktime/what-is/ (accessed in February 20, 2014)
  3. 3.
    AXMEDIS, http://www.axmedis.org/com/ (accessed in February 20, 2014)
  4. 4.
    Emmens, C.A.: slj/Video Watch. SLJ School Journal, 40–41 (February 1981)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tani, M., Yamaashi, K., Tanikoshi, K., Futukawa, M., Tanifuji, S.: Object-oriented video: interaction with real-world objects through live video. In: CHI 1992 Proceedings, pp. 593–598. ACM (1992)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rack, C., Seeliger, R., Arbanowski, S.: Featured Media Nonlinear, clickable multimedia content for an interactive video experience. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Second International Conferences in Advances in Multimedia, pp. 39–43. IEEE Computer Society (2010)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wang, J., Bhat, P., Colburn, R.A., Agrawala, M., Cohen, M.F.: Interactive Video Cutout. In: ACM Transactions on Graphics (TOG) – Proceedings of ACM SIGGRAPH 2005, vol. 24(3), pp. 585–594. ACM (2005)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Goularte, R., Moreira, E.S., Pimentel, M.G.: Structuring Interactive TV Documents. In: Proceedings of DocEng 2003, pp. 42–51. ACM (2003)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Smith, J.C., Stotts, D.: An extensible Object Tracking Architecture for Hyperlinking in Real-time and Stored Video Streams. In: Technical Report TR02-017. Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2002)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamim Fonseca
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hugo Paredes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paulo Martins
    • 1
    • 2
  • André Alberto
    • 1
  • José Rego
    • 1
  • Leonel Morgado
    • 2
    • 3
  • Arnaldo Santos
    • 4
  1. 1.Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD)Vila RealPortugal
  2. 2.INESC TEC - INESC Technology and SciencePortoPortugal
  3. 3.Universidade AbertaLisbonPortugal
  4. 4.Portugal Telecom InovaçãoAveiroPortugal

Personalised recommendations