Advertisement

Early Influences and Career Evolution

  • Serwan M. J. BabanEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Throughout my career, I have been interested in research; I enjoy finding the interesting and complex connections between sometimes equally complex ideas. I am also interested in the practical applications of geosciences scientific concepts under different physical and environmental conditions.

Keywords

Remote Sensing Water Resource Management Wind Farm Personal Protective Equipment Caribbean Region 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Ahmad R, Baban SMJ (2004) A new approach for characterising floods in the Caribbean Region. Enduring geohazards (Landslides and Floods) in the Caribbean Region, A workshop organised by the Center for Caribbean Land and Environmental Appraisal Research (CLEAR), UWI, December 2004, Learning Resource Center, St. Augustine, Trinidad. Trinidad and TobagoGoogle Scholar
  2. Akumu C, Pathirana S, Baban SMJ, Butcher D (2010a) Monitoring coastal wetland communities in North-Eastern NSW using ASTER and landsat satellite data. Wetland Ecol Manag 18(3):357–565CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Akumu C, Pathirana S, Baban SMJ, Bucher D (2010b) Modeling methane emission from wetlands in North Eastern NSW, Australia using landsat Etm+. J Remote Sens 2(5):1378–1399CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Akumu C, Pathirana S, Baban SMJ (2011) Examining the potential impacts of sea level rise on coastal wetlands in North-Eastern NSW Australia. J Coast Conserv Plan Manage 2(5):1378–1399Google Scholar
  5. Aliasgar K, Baban SMJ (2006) Developing a geoinformatics based early warning system for landslides in Tobago. Urban & Regional Information Systems Association Conference, URISA’s 2006 Caribbean GIS (CD-ROM), Bahamas, 13 ppGoogle Scholar
  6. Aliasgar K, Baban SMJ (2009) A preliminary assessment into the development of a geoinformatics based vulnerability index for developing countries. The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) annual conference, reflection of the past, vision of the future, Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel at Baltimore, Maryland’s Inner Harbor, USA, 9–13 Mar 2009Google Scholar
  7. Al-Adamat RA, Baban SMJ (2004) Mapping groundwater level and depth within the Azraq basin in Jordan using GIS. Survey Land Info Sci J 64(2):97–105Google Scholar
  8. Al-Adamat RA, Baban SMJ, Foster I (2004) An examination of land use change due to irrigated agriculture in the northeastern Jordan using geoinformatics. Int J Environ Stud 61(3):337–350CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. AL-Ansari N, Baban SMJ (2001) The climate and water resources, Chap. 3 In: Baban SMJ, AL-Ansari N (eds) Living with water scarcity, water resources in the Jordan Badia region, the way forward. AL al-Bayt University Publications, Jordan, pp 31–53Google Scholar
  10. Alsinawi SA, Baban SMJ (1984) Seismological engineering considerations for the Hemrin Dam area. In: Second Iraqi hydrological conference, p 10, Baghdad, IraqGoogle Scholar
  11. Alsinawi SA, Baban SMJ (1986a) Seismicity of the Hemrin Area- North Central Iraq. J Geol Soc Iraq 19(3):235–245Google Scholar
  12. Alsinawi SA, Baban SMJ (1986b) Seismicity of the Hemrin Area North Central Iraq. In: Proceedings of the 27th international geological congress, p 14, MoscowGoogle Scholar
  13. Alsinawi SA, Baban SMJ, Issa AS (1985) Historical seismicity of the Arab region. In: Proceedings of the symposium on historical seismogrames and earthquakes of the World, pp 59–83, Tokyo, JapanGoogle Scholar
  14. Al-Tahir R, Baban SMJ (2005) An evaluation of recent changes in mangrove forest habitats in West Trinidad. Trop Biodivers 8(3):187–198Google Scholar
  15. Al-Tahir R, Baban SMJ (2006) Using remote sensing to develop land degradation indicators for the Caribbean. In: Devereux BJ, Amable GS, Fuller RM (eds) Proceedings of RSPSoc 2006: understanding a changing world, ISBN: 0 946226 36 9 (CD-ROM). University of Cambridge, UK, 10 pGoogle Scholar
  16. Al-Tahir R, Baban SMJ, Ramlal B (2006) Utilizing emerging geo-imaging technologies for the management of tropical coastal environments. West Indian J Eng 29(1):11–21Google Scholar
  17. Ashmore W, Knapp AB (1999) Archaeologies of landscape: contemporary perspectives. Blackwell, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  18. Baban SMJ (1993a) The evaluation of different algorithms for bathymetric mapping of lakes using landsat imagery. Int J Remote Sens 14(12):2263–2273CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Baban SMJ (1993b) Detecting and evaluating the influence of water depth, volume and altitude on variations in the surface temperature of lakes using landsat imagery. Int J Remote Sens 14(15):2747–2758CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Baban SMJ (1993c) Detecting water quality parameters in Norfolk Broads, UK, using landsat imagery. Int J Remote Sens 14(7):1247–1267CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Baban SMJ (1994) Mapping turbidity, surface temperature and water circulation patterns with the aid of satellite imagery. J I Water Environ Manage 8(2):197–204CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Baban SMJ (1995) The use of landsat imagery to map fluvial sediments discharge into coastal waters. Marine Geol Int J Marine Geol Geochem Geophys 123:263–270Google Scholar
  23. Baban SMJ (1997) Potential applications of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems in minimising water related natural hazards in the Arab region: examining IRAQ as A case study. In: IAHS International symposium on remote sensing and gis for design and operation of water resources systems, vol 242. IAHS Publications, pp 23–32Google Scholar
  24. Baban SMJ (1998a) An integrated approach to minimise natural habitat loss in Tunisia. In: Proceedings of the Satellite-based observation: a tool for the study of the mediterranean basin, international conference, pp 57–64. The Centre National D’ETUDES SPATIALESB, November 1998, TunisiaGoogle Scholar
  25. Baban SMJ (1998b) An integrated approach to effectively manage reservoirs in the Maghreb states of North Africa: examining Tunisia as a case study. In: Proceedings of the Satellite-based observation: a tool for the study of the mediterranean basin, international conference, pp 41–49. The Centre National D’ETUDES SPATIALESR, November 1998, TunisiaGoogle Scholar
  26. Baban SMJ (1999a) Understanding hydrological processes in catchments using remotely sensed tracers and geographical information systems. In: IAHS international symposium on integrated methods in catchment hydrology-tracer, remote sensing and new hydrometric techniques, vol 258. IAHS Publications, pp 57–66. Birmingham, 19–30 July 1999Google Scholar
  27. Baban SMJ (1999b) A research agenda to minimise environmental degradation in the Badia region, using remote sensing and GIS. In: The water resources and environment in the Badia Region, international workshop, 12–17 July 1999. AL al-Bayt University, Mafraq, JordanGoogle Scholar
  28. Baban SMJ (2000) Developing a holistic plan to manage desertification and water shortages in the Badia region in Jordan using remote sensing and GIS. Desertification Control Bulletin. United Nations Environmental Programme. No. 36, pp 34–41Google Scholar
  29. Baban SMJ (2001a) Managing natural habitat loss in the Caribbean Region using remotely sensed data and GIS: examining Trinidad and Tobago as a case study. In: Proceedings of the Urban and regional information systems association (URISA) 2001 Caribbean GIS conference, pp 153–163. Montego Bay, JamaicaGoogle Scholar
  30. Baban SMJ (2001b) Managing the environment in the Caribbean Region using remotely sensed data and GIS. In: Proceedings of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA) 2001 Caribbean GIS conference, 202–213. Montego Bay, JamaicaGoogle Scholar
  31. Baban SMJ (2003) Developing a system to monitor natural vegetation and its habitats in the Caribbean region. J Trop Biodivers 8(2):87–93Google Scholar
  32. Baban SMJ (2004a) Identifying optimum waste disposal site locations in the Caribbean Region using geoinformatics. In: Proceedings of the second Caribbean environmental forum and exhibition (GEF-2), parallel session 15: appropriate environmental technologies and systems, 10 p (on CD). TrinidadGoogle Scholar
  33. Baban SMJ (2004b) Developing a Geoinformatics-based approach to locate wind farms in the Caribbean Region, using Trinidad and Tobago as a case study. In: Proceedings of the second Caribbean environmental forum and exhibition (GEF-2), parallel session 15: appropriate environmental technologies and systems, 10 p (on CD). TrinidadGoogle Scholar
  34. Baban SMJ (2004c) Attaining a balance between environmental protection and sustainable development in the Caribbean Region using geoinformatics. West Indian J Eng 26(2):22–34Google Scholar
  35. Baban SMJ (2005) Transforming Gehazards (floods and landslides) management in Trinidad and Tobago from reactive to a proactive mode. In: American chamber of commerce of Trinidad and Tobago conference, (CD-ROM), Crowne Plaza, TrinidadGoogle Scholar
  36. Baban SMJ (2006) A Strategy for managing geohazards (floods and landslides) in Trinidad and Tobago. In: Urban and regional information systems association conference, URISA’s 2006 Caribbean GIS, 30 Oct–2 Nov 2006, BahamasGoogle Scholar
  37. Baban SMJ (2008a) Developing a proactive approach to disaster (geohazards) management and risk reduction using geoinformatics. In: United Nations regional UN-SPIDER workshop: building upon regional space-based solutions for disaster management and emergency response for the pacific region, 10 p. Suva, Fiji, 16–19 Sept 2008. CD-ROMGoogle Scholar
  38. Baban SMJ (2008b) Irrigated agriculture, development and sustainable groundwater usage issues in the North Eastern Badia region of Jordan, 8 p. In: The international groundwater conference, groundwater India 88, 19–22 March 2008. University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India, 7 pGoogle Scholar
  39. Baban SMJ (2008c) A geoinformatics based approach to manage floods in the Caribbean region, examining Trinidad as a case study. In: United Nations regional UN-SPIDER workshop, CD-ROM, 10 p, Suva, Fiji, 16–19 Sept 2008Google Scholar
  40. Baban SMJ (ed) (2008d) Enduring geohazards in the Caribbean, moving from the reactive to the proactive. University of the West Indies Press, Jamaica, West Indies, 256 p. ISBN: 978-976-640-204-4Google Scholar
  41. Baban SMJ (2009a) A formula for writing a successful M.Phil/Ph.D. Thesis. Chapter 18. In: Baban SMJ (ed) Research, the journey from pondering to publishing. Canoe Press. Jamaica, West Indies. 264 p. ISBN: 978-976-8125-90-3Google Scholar
  42. Baban SMJ (2009b) Developing a rapid field based approach for non specialists to indentify landslide prone areas. J Disaster Adv 2(4):43–47Google Scholar
  43. Baban SMJ (2009c) A proactive approach to geohazards management in developing countries using geoinformatics: the Caribbean experience. J Disaster Adv 2(1):14–21Google Scholar
  44. Baban SMJ (ed) (2009d) Research, the journey from pondering to publishing. University of the West Indies Press. Jamaica, West Indies, 264 p. ISBN: 978-976-8125-90-3Google Scholar
  45. Baban SMJ (2011) The role of the Kurdistan region government higher education institutions in the process of nation building. In: First World Kurdish congress (WKC2011), 7–9 Oct 2011, Rotterdam, NetherlandsGoogle Scholar
  46. Baban SMJ (2012a) Building a secure future through realizing sustinbale development in the federal region of Kurdistan. In: Second Scientific World Kurdish congress (WKC2012), 12–14 Oct 2012, Erbil, Kurdistan Regional Government, IraqGoogle Scholar
  47. Baban SMJ (2012b) University of Kurdistan Hewler: a possible model for establishing independent international universities within developing countries. In: Second Scientific World Kurdish congress (WKC2012), 12–14 Oct 2012, Erbil, Kurdistan Regional Government, IraqGoogle Scholar
  48. Baban SMJ (2012c) The role of the Kurdistan region government higher education institutions in the process of nation building. Chapter 7. In: Heshmati A, Dilani A, Baban SMJ (eds) Perspectives on Kurdistan’s economy and society in transition, vol 1. Nova Science Publishers, USA, pp 73–83. ISBN: 978-1-62257-934-1Google Scholar
  49. Baban SMJ (2012d) Achieving sustainable food and water resources production and security in the Kurdistan region, Iraq; challenges and opportunities. In: Agriculture and water resources in Kurdistan Iraq; issues and opportunities conference, 13–14 Nov 2012. UK, LondonGoogle Scholar
  50. Baban SMJ (2013a) A road map for sustainably managing water resources in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq. Keynote Speaker, Water Iraq Summit, Istanbul, Turkey, 11–12 Mar 2013Google Scholar
  51. Baban SMJ (2013b) Developing a 5 year strategic plan for the ministry of agriculture and water resources, Kurdistan regional government, Iraq. In: Sulaymaniya province regional conference, June 2013Google Scholar
  52. Baban SMJ (2013c) Agriculture and water resources in Kurdistan Region; Issues and opportunities. Kurdistan Projects, organised by MEED, Erbil Rotana Hotel, Erbil, 10–12 June 2013Google Scholar
  53. Baban SMJ (2013d) Developing a 5 year strategic plan for the Ministry of Agriculture and Water Resources, Kurdistan regional Government, Duhock Province Regional conference, Iraq, June 2013Google Scholar
  54. Baban SMJ (2013e) Progress in the agricultural and water resource sectors of the Kurdistan Regional Government, Iraq. Third World Kurdish Scientific Congress, Stockholm, Sweden, 11–13 OctGoogle Scholar
  55. Baban SMJ (2013f) Agriculture and food production in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq: challenges and opportunities. International Cooperation Platform, 4th Bosphorus Sumit, Four Seasons Hotel Bosphorus, Istanbul, Turkey, 20–22 NovGoogle Scholar
  56. Baban SMJ, AL-Ansari N (eds) (2001) Living with water scarcity, water resources in the Jordan Badia region, the way forward. AL al-Bayt University Publications, Jordan, 211 ppGoogle Scholar
  57. Baban SMJ, Aliasgar K (2007) Using geoinformatics to examine debris flows generated by hurricane emily in Trinidad, West Indies. The 2nd international conference of GIS/RS in hydrology, water Resources and Environment (ICGRHWE’06) and the 2nd international symposium on flood forecasting and management with GIS and remote sensing (FM2S’06), 17–23 Sept 2007, Guangzhou and Three Gorges, China. (CD-ROM), 10 pGoogle Scholar
  58. Baban SMJ, Aliasgar K (2008a) Using geoinformatics to characterise areas vulnerable to debris flows in the tropics: a case study of Northern Trinidad. West Indies. J Disaster Adv 1(4):20–26Google Scholar
  59. Baban SMJ, Aliasgar K (2008b) Mapping flood prone areas in the Caribbean using historical data, geophysical terrain characteristics and geoinformatics. In: The second international conference on geoinformatics technology for natural disaster management and rehabilitation, pp 100–106, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Bangkok, Thailand. ISBN: 9789743833113Google Scholar
  60. Baban SMJ, Aliasgar K (2009) Using carrying capacity and multi-criteria analysis to proactively manage floods in the Caribbean. Int J Geoinfo 5(4):55–62Google Scholar
  61. Baban SMJ, Alsinawi S (1986) The microseismicity of Hemren area, Iraq from 1979 to 1982, a comparative study. In: Iraqi scientific research centre conference, Baghdad, Iraq, 1986Google Scholar
  62. Baban SMJ, Cannisus F (2008) Mapping flood prone areas, a geoinformatics approach. Chapter 9, In: Baban SMJ (ed) Enduring geohazards in the Caribbean Region, moving from the reactive to the proactive. 157–178Google Scholar
  63. Baban SMJ, Flannagan J (1998) Developing and implementing GIS-assisted constraints criteria for selecting potential landfill sites in the UK. Plan Prac Res J 13(12):139–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Baban SMJ, Jules-Moore S (2005) An evaluation of water circulation and contaminant transport models for the intra-American seas. West Indian J Eng 27(2):1–17Google Scholar
  65. Baban SMJ, Luke C (2000) Mapping agricultural land use using retrospective ground survey data, satellite imagery and GIS. Int J Remote Sens 21(8):1757–1762CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Baban SMJ, Parry T (2001) Developing and applying a GIS-assisted approach to locating wind farms in the UK. Renewable Energy J 24:59–71Google Scholar
  67. Baban SMJ, Sant KJ (2005) Mapping landslide susceptibility for the Caribbean island of Tobago using GIS, multi-criteria evaluation techniques with a varied weighted approach. Caribbean J Earth Sci 38:11–20Google Scholar
  68. Baban SMJ, Sant KJ (2006) Mapping critical slopes to landslide occurrence in a tropical environments using geographic information science: examining the case of Tobago. West Indian J Eng 29(1):33–43Google Scholar
  69. Baban SMJ Sant K (2008) Developing a GIS based landslide Susceptibility map for Tropical mountainous environments, using geo-environmental indicators. Chapter 4. In: Baban SMJ (ed) Enduring geohazards in the Caribbean Region, moving from the reactive to the proactive. 64–80, University of the West Indies Press, Jamaica, West Indies, 256p. ISBN: 978-976-640-204-4Google Scholar
  70. Baban SMJ, Wan-Yusof K (2002) Defining land units in tropical mountainous environments using remotely sensed information and GIS. Asian J Geoinf 2(4):19–28Google Scholar
  71. Baban SMJ, Ramsewak D, Canisius F (2009) Mapping and detecting land use/cover change in the tropical mountainous Island of Tobago using remote sensing and geographic information systems. Caribbean J Earth Sci 40:3–13Google Scholar
  72. Baban SMJ, Ramdath AD, Agard J (2005) Examination of climate change in small Islands using remotely sensed data. Caribbean J Earth Sci 14(2)Google Scholar
  73. Baban SMJ, Pathirana S, Aliasgar K, Habibi A (2008b) Mapping coastal benthic habitats in the Burnett Mary Region using remotely sensed imagery. A Report prepared for Central Queensland University, 28pGoogle Scholar
  74. Baban SMJ, Wan-Yusof K (2003) Modelling optimum sites for locating reservoirs in tropical environments. Water Resour Manage 17(1):1–17CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Baban SMJ, AL Oun S, Mohammed S (2003a) Let the desert bloom: an overview of an attempt to promote sustainable development and environmental protection in the Jordanian Badia Region. J Sustain Dev 11:159–170Google Scholar
  76. Baban SMJ, Sant KJ (2004) Mapping landslide susceptibility on a small mountainous tropical Island using GIS. Asian J Geoinf 5(1):33–42Google Scholar
  77. Baban SMJ, Wan-Yusof K, Al-Tahir R (2003b) Modelling hydrological catchment management and planning scenarios to minimise lake/reservoir sedimentation problems in tropical environments. Asian J Geoinf 3(4):19–31Google Scholar
  78. Baban SMJ, Sumith P, Aliasgar K, Abdullah H (2008a) Examining coastal erosion issues in Darwin, North Australia using field based data and geoinformatics. In: The second international conference on geoinformatics technology for natural disaster management and rehabilitation. 21–26, Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Bangkok, Thailand. ISBN: 9789743833113Google Scholar
  79. Bloom B (1964) Taxonomy of educational objectives: handbook 1: Cognitive Domain. LongmanGoogle Scholar
  80. Crandell G (1993) Nature pictorlialized: ‘The view’ in landscape history. John Hopkins University Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  81. Chinchamee A, Al-Tahir R, Baban SMJ (2008) Using geo-informatics to manage natural vegetation habitats in Trinidad. 20 p. In: The twenty-eighth annual ESRI international user conference, the San Diego convention center, San Diego, California, USA. CD-ROMGoogle Scholar
  82. Chinchamee A, Baban SMJ, Al-Tahir R (2006) Defining biophysical land units in tropical island of Trinidad using remote sensing, field data and GIS. In: Devereux BJ, Amable GS, Fuller RM (eds) Proceedings of RSPSoc 2006: understanding a changing World, ISBN: 0 946226 36 9 (CD-ROM). University of Cambridge, UKGoogle Scholar
  83. Cloke P, Doel M, Matless D, Phillips M, Thrift N (1994) Writing the rural: five cultural geographies. Chapman, LondonGoogle Scholar
  84. Cooke RU, Doornkamp JC (1978) Geomorphology in environmental management, an introduction. Oxford University Press, UKGoogle Scholar
  85. Dearing JA, Hay KL, Dann R, Baban SMJ, Huddleston L, Wellington EM (1996) Soil magnetism: testing conflicting theories. In: 21st general assembly of the European geophysical society. Haugh, Holland, 6–9 May 1996, p C128Google Scholar
  86. Dillard CB (2006) When the music changes, so should the dance: cultural and spiritual considerations in paradigm ‘proliferation’. Int J Qual Stud Educ 19(1):59–76CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Evans JG (1975) The environment of early man in the British Isles. Paul Elek. UK Educ 11:33–49Google Scholar
  88. Gibbs G (1988) Learning by doing. A guide to teaching and learning methods. FEUGoogle Scholar
  89. Gregory KJ (1985) The nature of physical geography. Edward Arnold, London 262pGoogle Scholar
  90. Haggett P (1975) Geography: a modern synthesis. New YorkGoogle Scholar
  91. Hay K, Dearing J, Baban SMJ, Loveland P (1994) Magnetic susceptibility of Topsoil’s in England. In: Soil magnetism workshop, November, 1994. Liverpool University, UKGoogle Scholar
  92. Hay K, Dearing J, Baban SMJ, Loveland P (1995) Using magnetic susceptibility measurements to map and classify english topsoils. European geophysics society conference, Hamburg, GermanyGoogle Scholar
  93. Hay KL, Dearing JA, Baban SMJ (1996) A preliminary attempt to identify pollution particulate in english topsoil, using magnetic susceptibility. 21st general assembly of the european geophysical society. Haugh, Holland, 6–9 May, P.C145Google Scholar
  94. Hay KL, Dearing JA, Baban SMJ, Loveland PJ (1997) A preliminary attempt to Identify atmospherically-derived pollution particles in english topsoil’s from magnetic susceptibility measurements. Phys Chem Earth 22(1–2):207–210Google Scholar
  95. Head L (2000) Cultural landscapes and environmental change. Arnold, LondonGoogle Scholar
  96. Jones G, Baban SMJ, Pathirana S (2008) Coastal erosion issues in the east point and Nightcliff areas of Darwin. Darwin City Council, Northern Territory, Australia, 48 pGoogle Scholar
  97. Lo CP (1986) Applied remote sensing. Longman, London, UKGoogle Scholar
  98. Lovelock JE (1960) Gaia: a new look at life on Earth. Oxford University Press, UKGoogle Scholar
  99. Moran B, Baban SMJ, Mighill T, Foster I (1996) Natural and semi-natural habitat loss in warwickshire, strategies to minimise the damage. Remote sensing society students meeting. University of Durham, UK, 12–14 Sept 1996Google Scholar
  100. Moran BM, Baban SMJ, Mighill T, Foster I (1997) The identification of habitat change using remote sensing data. In: The British ecological society winter meeting, University of Warwick. UK, Programme and Abstracts, p 106, 16–18 Dec 1997Google Scholar
  101. Muir R (1999) Approaches to landscape. Macmillan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  102. Park (1997) The environment, principals and applications. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  103. Pathirana S, Baban SMJ (2008) Assessing coastal vulnerability to climate change and anthropogenic factors around darwin, Northern Territory of Australia. 8 p. In: 29th Asian conference on remote sensing (ACRS 2008), 10–14 Nov 2008, Colombo, Sri LankaGoogle Scholar
  104. Pathirana S, Masato K, Baban SMJ (2007) Impact of climate and land cover/use variability on vector borne diseases: an analysis of epidemic outbreaks of malaria and dengue incidence. 28th Asian conference on Remote Sensing (ACRS 2007), 12–16 Nov 2007, Putra World Trade Center (PWTC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 8 pGoogle Scholar
  105. Ramdath AD, Baban SMJ, Agard J (2004) A preliminary investigation to the possible impact of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena on the climate of Trinidad and Tobago using remotely sensed data. In: Proceedings of the 2nd Caribbean environmental forum and exhibition (GEF-2), Parallel session 16: managing environmental disasters, West Indies, Trinidad, 10 pGoogle Scholar
  106. Ramlal B, Baban SMJ, AL-Tahir R (2004) GIS and mapping activities in the University of the West Indies, Trinidad. In: A workshop organised by the epidemiology division, Caribbean epidemiology centre (CAREC), Trinidad. Trinidad and TobagoGoogle Scholar
  107. Sant KJ, Baban SMJ (2006) Developing a GIS based landslide susceptibility map for tropical mountainous environments, using geo-environmental indicators. Urban & Regional information systems association conference, URISA’s 2006 Caribbean GIS, (CD-ROM). Bahamas, 12 pGoogle Scholar
  108. Schama S (1995) Landscape and memory. Harper Collins, LondonGoogle Scholar
  109. Stoddart S (ed) (2000) Landscapes from antiquity. Antiquity Publications, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  110. Wade S, Foster I, Baban SMJ, Thompson D (1995) Catchment scale modelling, field studies and management of Nitrate in UK soils and surface waters. Combined BGRG/BIORG session, landscape ecology and the integrated management of drainage basins. In: IBG annual conference, 3–6 Jan 1995. University of Northumbria at Newcastle, UKGoogle Scholar
  111. Wade S, Foster IDL, Baban SMJ (1996) The spatial variability of soil Nitrates in Arable and Pasture landscapes; implications for the development of geographical information system models of nitrate leaching. Soil Use Manag 12:95–101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Wan Yusof K, Baban SMJ (1998) A preliminary land use/cover classification for the Langkawi Island, Malaysia using remote sensing and GIS. In: The proceedings of the remote sensing 98, 24th annual conference of the remote sensing society, September 1998, The University of Greenwich, UK. 7 pGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Office of the MinisterMinistry of Agriculture and Water ResourcesHewlerIraq

Personalised recommendations