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Use of a Cognitive Simulator to Enhance Students’ Mental Simulation Activities

  • Kazuhisa Miwa
  • Jyunya Morita
  • Hitoshi Terai
  • Nana Kanzaki
  • Kazuaki Kojima
  • Ryuichi Nakaike
  • Hitomi Saito
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8474)

Abstract

We developed a cognitive simulator of the dual storage model of the human memory system that simulates the serial position effect of a traditional memory recall experiment. In a cognitive science class, participants learned cognitive information processing while observing the memory processes visualized by the simulator. Through the practice, we confirmed that participants learned to predict experimental results in assumed situations implying that participants successfully constructed a mental model and performed mental simulations while running the mental model in various settings. We discuss the possibility that a cognitive model can be used as a learning tool and, more specifically, as a mediator tool connecting theory and empirical data.

Keywords

mental model cognitive model mental simulation cognitive science class 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhisa Miwa
    • 1
  • Jyunya Morita
    • 2
  • Hitoshi Terai
    • 1
  • Nana Kanzaki
    • 3
  • Kazuaki Kojima
    • 4
  • Ryuichi Nakaike
    • 5
  • Hitomi Saito
    • 6
  1. 1.Graduate School of Information ScienceNagoya UniversityJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Knowledge ScienceJaistJapan
  3. 3.Junior CollegeNagoya Woman’s UniversityJapan
  4. 4.Learning Technology LaboratoryTeikyo UniversityJapan
  5. 5.Graduate School of EducationKyoto UniversityJapan
  6. 6.Faculty of EducationAichi University of EducationJapan

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