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Different Models, Different Emphases, Different Insights

  • Mark Bray
  • Bob Adamson
  • Mark Mason
Chapter
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 19)

Abstract

This final chapter pulls together some themes from earlier chapters, and in a sense makes a comparison of comparisons. The earlier chapters have addressed a range of foci within a variety of paradigms. Using insights from the book, this final chapter begins with a discussion of models for comparative education research. It then makes some remarks about emphases, before concluding with comments about the insights than can be gained from comparative approaches and methods in educational research.

Keywords

North American Free Trade Agreement Comparative Education Early Chapter Comparative Education Review Comparative Education Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Bray
    • 1
  • Bob Adamson
    • 1
  • Mark Mason
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCO International Institute for Educational PlanningParisFrance

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