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Comparing Pedagogical Innovations

  • Nancy Law
Chapter
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 19)

Abstract

Innovation seems to be a constant – and necessary – theme in education. A common underlying rationale is that changes in education of all levels and types prepare citizens for life in the knowledge society. The contexts include intensifying globalisation, progressively shorter half-lives of knowledge, and economic competitiveness which requires increased collaboration and different ways of working (Hershock et al. 2007; Scardamalia & Bereiter 2010). As the creation and dissemination of knowledge are perceived to be of paramount importance, education requires new goals and processes. This view is applicable both in economically advanced countries (e.g. European Round Table of Industrialists 1997; OECD 2004) and in less developed countries (e.g. UNESCO 2003; Kozma 2008).

Keywords

Pedagogical Practice Pedagogical Innovation Innovation Case Strategic Alignment Digital Textbook 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Law
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCO International Institute for Educational PlanningParisFrance

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