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Actors and Purposes in Comparative Education

  • Mark Bray
Chapter
Part of the CERC Studies in Comparative Education book series (CERC, volume 19)

Abstract

The nature of any particular comparative study of education depends on the purposes for which it was undertaken and on the identity of the person(s) conducting the enquiry. This first chapter begins by noting different categories of people who undertake comparative studies of education. It then focuses on three of these groups: policy makers, international agencies, and academics. Although this book is chiefly concerned with the last of these groups, it is instructive to note similarities and differences between the purposes and approaches of academics and other groups.

Keywords

Comparative Education United Nations Educational World Bank Economic Review Comparative Education Research Policy Borrow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Bray
    • 1
  1. 1.UNESCO International Institute for Educational PlanningParisFrance

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