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Incorporating Social Theories in Computational Behavioral Models

  • Eunice E. Santos
  • Eugene SantosJr.
  • John Korah
  • Riya George
  • Qi Gu
  • Jacob Jurmain
  • Keumjoo Kim
  • Deqing Li
  • Jacob Russell
  • Suresh Subramanian
  • Jeremy E. Thompson
  • Fei Yu
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8393)

Abstract

Computational social science methodologies are increasingly being viewed as critical for modeling complex individual and organizational behaviors in dynamic, real world scenarios. However, many challenges for identifying, representing and incorporating appropriate socio-cultural behaviors remain. Social theories provide rules, which have strong theoretic underpinnings and have been empirically validated, for representing and analyzing individual and group interactions. The key insight in this paper is that social theories can be embedded into computational models as functional mappings based on underlying factors, structures and interactions in social systems. We describe a generic framework, called a Culturally Infused Social Network (CISN), which makes such mappings realizable with its abilities to incorporate multi-domain socio-cultural factors, model at multiple scales, and represent dynamic information. We explore the incorporation of different social theories for added rigor to modeling and analysis by analyzing the fall of the Islamic Courts Union (ICU) regime in Somalia during the latter half of 2006. Specifically, we incorporate the concepts of homophily and frustration to examine the strength of the ICU’s alliances during its rise and fall. Additionally, we employ Affect Control Theory (ACT) to improve the resolution and detail of the model, and thus enhance the explanatory power of the CISN framework.

Keywords

Socio-cultural behavioral models Computational social science Social networks Group stability Somalia 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eunice E. Santos
    • 1
  • Eugene SantosJr.
    • 2
  • John Korah
    • 1
  • Riya George
    • 1
  • Qi Gu
    • 2
  • Jacob Jurmain
    • 2
  • Keumjoo Kim
    • 2
  • Deqing Li
    • 2
  • Jacob Russell
    • 2
  • Suresh Subramanian
    • 1
  • Jeremy E. Thompson
    • 2
  • Fei Yu
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentThe University of Texas at El PasoEl PasoUSA
  2. 2.Thayer School of EngineeringDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA

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