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Multi-level Governance, Resilience to Flood Risks and Coproduction in Urban Africa

Chapter
Part of the Future City book series (FUCI, volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter examines how climate change adaptation becomes integrated as a policy field within multi-level governance in the two coastal cities of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Saint Louis, Senegal. We explore the ways in which this policy sector works towards resilient cities as it interfaces with the governance of flood risks.

In Dar es Salaam, we find that adaptation and flood risk management have no substantive organisational home at municipal level. These policy fields are not well integrated into the city’s land use planning and development at a local level. Public officials, to a limited degree, encourage citizen participation in flood risk management and land use planning. In Saint Louis, public officials, especially municipal planners, actively encourage citizen participation in flood risk management and local development planning. We suggest that it is not the size and adaptive capacity of the municipality, per se, that matter for the integration and functioning of climate risk management at local level. Rather, it is the way multi-level governance enables or constrains the ability of public officials to enhance the responsiveness of citizens and their input into the coproduction of services and water resources management. The chapter refers to theories of coproduction within multi-level governance to explain drivers and barriers to adaptation and resilience.

Keywords

Climate resilience in urban Africa Multi-level governance Floods Coproduction 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of International StudiesNorwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research (NIBR)OsloNorway
  2. 2.Institute of Human Settlements StudiesArdhi UniversityDar es SalaamTanzania
  3. 3.Department of GeographyUniversity of Gaston BergerSaint LouisSenegal
  4. 4.Sund EnergyOsloNorway

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