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Digital Library Training for Elderly Students at the Open University of Japan

  • Makiko Miwa
  • Hideaki Takahashi
  • Emi Nishina
  • Yoko Hirose
  • Yoshitomo Yaginuma
  • Akemi Kawafuchi
  • Toshio Akimitsu
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 397)

Abstract

The Open University of Japan (OUJ) offers distance-learning programs through courses broadcast by TV and radio, in addition to face-to-face courses offered at 50 study centers nationwide. Recently, the OUJ started to implement ICT, including Web-based delivery of courses and online registration, but these options have not been fully utilized by students. This is mainly because some older students at the OUJ had little experience in using PCs and/or the Internet. To prepare students to use the Internet and maximize Web-based learning opportunities, the OUJ began offering a digital literacy training (DLT) course at each study center in October 2010 as a 12-hour intensive course, using standardized teaching materials and a common syllabus. A series of checklist surveys was conducted before and after each course to measure the learning outcomes and perceived self-efficacy of the students. Learning outcomes and student perceptions of their digital skills were significantly improved.

Keywords

Digital literacy training faculty development lifelong learning information literacy for adults 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makiko Miwa
    • 1
  • Hideaki Takahashi
    • 1
  • Emi Nishina
    • 1
  • Yoko Hirose
    • 1
  • Yoshitomo Yaginuma
    • 1
  • Akemi Kawafuchi
    • 1
  • Toshio Akimitsu
    • 1
  1. 1.The Open University of JapanChiba-shiJapan

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