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Personalized Smart Environments to Increase Inclusion of People with Down’s Syndrome

  • Juan Carlos Augusto
  • Terje Grimstad
  • Reiner Wichert
  • Eva Schulze
  • Andreas Braun
  • Gro Marit Rødevand
  • Vanda Ridley
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8309)

Abstract

Most people with Downs Syndrome (DS) experience low integration with society. Recent research and new opportunities for their integration in mainstream education and work provided numerous cases where levels of achievement exceeded the (limiting) expectations. This paper describes a project, POSEIDON, aiming at developing a technological infrastructure which can foster a growing number of services developed to support people with DS. People with DS have their own strengths, preferences and needs so POSEIDON will focus on using their strengths to provide support for their needs whilst allowing each individual to personalize the solution based on their preferences. This project is user-centred from its inception and will give all main stakeholders ample opportunities to shape the output of the project, which will ensure a final outcome which is of practical usefulness and interest to the intended users.

Keywords

Down’s Syndrome Inclusion Activities Supporting Independence and Integration 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Carlos Augusto
    • 1
  • Terje Grimstad
    • 2
  • Reiner Wichert
    • 3
  • Eva Schulze
    • 4
  • Andreas Braun
    • 3
  • Gro Marit Rødevand
    • 2
  • Vanda Ridley
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Science and TechnologyMiddlesex UniversityLondonUK
  2. 2.Karde ASOsloNorway
  3. 3.Fraunhofer Institut fr Graphische DatenverarbeitungDarmstadtGermany
  4. 4.Institut fur SozialforschungBerlinGermany
  5. 5.Down’s Syndrome AssociationLondonUK

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