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Return to Activities of Daily Life: Physiotherapy Rehabilitation with Serious Game

  • Juan Manuel González-Calleros
  • Sergio Arturo Arzola-Herrera
  • Josefina Guerrero-García
  • Etelvina Archundia-Sierra
  • Jaime Muñoz-Arteaga
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8277)

Abstract

Everyday people suffer from accidents at their home while doing activities of daily life. This results in physical and cognitive injuries that need physiotherapy rehabilitation. Some physiotherapy problems reported by physiotherapists are: lack of patient commitment, lack of motivation and lack of patient feedback to communicate their progress. Thus, it is very frequent that patients abandon their therapy. In this work we investigate the process of creating serious games as a solution to the aforementioned problems. We explore in deep the process of physiotherapy rehabilitation to generate a list of problems and propose a list of requirements as a solution. We present the design using a formal framework to define the analysis, design and some elements of the developed system, which still is in a prototype phase.

Keywords

Rehabilitation User Interface Physiotherapy Serious Game 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan Manuel González-Calleros
    • 1
  • Sergio Arturo Arzola-Herrera
    • 1
  • Josefina Guerrero-García
    • 1
  • Etelvina Archundia-Sierra
    • 1
  • Jaime Muñoz-Arteaga
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science FacultyBenemérita Universidad Autónoma de PueblaPueblaMexico
  2. 2.Universidad Autónoma de AguascalientesAguascalientesMexico

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