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Promoting Specialised Vocabulary Learning Through Computer-Assisted Instruction

  • Mª Dolores Perea-BarberáEmail author
  • Ana Bocanegra-Valle
Chapter
Part of the Educational Linguistics book series (EDUL, volume 19)

Abstract

This paper explores the implementation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in the English for Specific Purposes (ESP) classroom in general, and the Maritime English (ME) classroom in particular, and addresses the challenges posed for specialised vocabulary instruction and learning. Firstly, some key issues on ICT-based pedagogy and vocabulary instruction are explored: vocabulary teaching techniques as revised in current literature, what is to be understood by ESP and ME vocabulary, the notion of digital literacy, the contribution of computers to vocabulary learning and development, and implications of the lifelong learning construct within the framework of the European Space for Higher Education. Secondly, relevant literature on recurrent topics in this paper is discussed. Next, this paper focuses on the use of the Moodle glossary tool for strategic specialised vocabulary development and particular attention is paid to the creation of the Maritime Glossary (a project aimed to complement classroom work). To conclude, learners’ opinions based on a questionnaire administered upon the completion of the glossary and interviews held at the end of the course are presented and discussed.

Keywords

Language Learning Lifelong Learning Digital Literacy Vocabulary Learning Vocabulary Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mª Dolores Perea-Barberá
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ana Bocanegra-Valle
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Filología Francesa e InglesaUniversidad de CádizCádizSpain

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