Advertisement

The Study Area

  • Anup SaikiaEmail author
Chapter
  • 454 Downloads
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Geography book series (BRIEFSGEOGRAPHY)

Abstract

The seven states of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, and Tripura make up north east India. The region spreads over 255,037 km2 or about 7.7 % of India’s total geographical area. The relief is rugged with plateaus, hills and mountains dominating. Level lowlands are at a premium covering only 27 % of the area. Rainfall is torrential with 6,300 mm annually a routine occurrence in the Cherrapunji area. In the rest of the region, average annual precipitation ranges from 1,000 to over 4,000 mm with the bulk of it occurring during the monsoon months of June to October. Stemming from this a luxuriant tropical vegetation ranging from alpine, subtropical pine and montane to evergreen and moist deciduous thrives making the region a global biodiversity hotspot. The focus of development in has centred around its primary resource base, largely around tea, timber and petroleum. What little else exists in the name of development has been concentrated in the urban landscapes. It is not surprising that in the region’s rural areas a dependence on natural resources—forests in particular—exists and there is not much option than to exploit the region’s forest resources.

Keywords

Arunachal Pradesh Assam Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Tripura 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The population map of North East India was prepared utilizing the LandScan (2008)™ High Resolution global Population Data Set copyrighted by UT-Battelle, LLC, operator of Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the United States Department of Energy. The United States Government has certain rights in this Data Set. The United States Government has certain rights in this Data Set. Neither UT-BATTELLE, LLC NOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY OF THEIR EMPLOYEES, MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, OR ASSUMES ANY LEGAL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE DATA SET.

References

  1. Arunachalam A, Sarmah R, Adhikari D, Majumdar M, Khan ML (2004) Anthropogenic threats and biodiversity conservation in Namdapha nature reserve in the Indian eastern himalayas. Curr Sci 87:447–454Google Scholar
  2. Barthakur M (1986) Weather and climate of north east India. North East Geogr 18:20–27Google Scholar
  3. Bhakta GP (1991) Geography of Meghalaya. Akashi Book Depot, ShillongGoogle Scholar
  4. Brown D, Schreckenberg K (1998) Shifting cultivators as agents of forest degradation: assessing the evidence. Natural Resource Perspectives Number 29. Overseas Development Institute, LondonGoogle Scholar
  5. Das HP, Singh DK, Sharma HN (1971) Meghalaya-Mikir Region In: Singh RL (ed) India: a regional geography. National Geographical Society of India, VaranasiGoogle Scholar
  6. Ellis EC, Ramankutty N (2008) Putting people in the map: anthropogenic biomes of the world. Front Ecol Environ 6:439–447. doi: 10.1890/070062 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Gopalakrishnan R (1991) The north east India: land, economy and people. Har-Anand, New DelhiGoogle Scholar
  8. Hazarika R, Saikia A (2013) The pachyderm and the pixel: an assessment of elephant habitat suitability in Sonitpur, India. Int J Remote Sens 34:5317–5330. doi: 10.1080/01431161.2013.787503 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kashyap SC (1990) National forest policy. In: Kashyap SC (ed) National policy studies. Tata McGraw Hill, New DelhiGoogle Scholar
  10. Lele N, Joshi PK (2009) Analyzing deforestation rates, spatial forest cover changes and identifying critical areas of forest cover changes in north-east India during 1972–1999. Environ Monit Assess 156:159–170. doi: 10.1007/s10661-008-0472-6
  11. Prasad J (1971) Eastern himalaya. In: Singh RL (ed) India: a regional geography. National Geographical Society of India, VaranasiGoogle Scholar
  12. Saikia A, Hazarika R, Sahariah D (2013) Land use land cover change and fragmentation in the Nameri Tiger Reserve, India. Geogr Tidsskr-Dan J Geogr 113:1–10. doi: 10.1080/00167223.2013.782991 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. SFR (1996) State Forest Report 1995. FSI, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, Dehra DunGoogle Scholar
  14. SFR (1998) State Forest Report 1997. FSI, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, Dehra DunGoogle Scholar
  15. SFR (2000) State Forest Report 1999. FSI, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, Dehra DunGoogle Scholar
  16. SFR (2008) State Forest Report 2005. FSI, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, Dehra DunGoogle Scholar
  17. SFR (2009) State of Forest Report 2009. FSI, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, Dehra DunGoogle Scholar
  18. Taher M (1986) Physiographic framework of north east India. North East Geogr 18:1–19Google Scholar
  19. Tisdell C, Roy K (1997) Sustainability of land use in north-east India: issues involving economics, the environment and biodiversity. Int J Soc Econ 24:160–177. doi: 10.1108/03068299710161188 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Tucker RP (1988) The depletion of India’s forests under British imperialism: planters, foresters, and peasants in Assam and Kerala. In: Worster D (ed) The ends of the earth : perspectives on modern environmental history. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  21. Tucker RP (1988a) The British empire and India’s forest resources: the timberlands of Assam and Kumaon 1914-1950. In: Richards JF, Tucker RP (eds) World deforestation in the twentieth century. Duke University Press, Durham and LondonGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyGauhati UniversityGuwahatiIndia

Personalised recommendations