Advertisement

Educational Policy, Development of Education, and Economic Growth in Korea

Chapter
Part of the The Political Economy of the Asia Pacific book series (PEAP, volume 13)

Abstract

It is a well-known fact that national development in Korea—especially the rapid economic growth—has taken place largely because of the country’s highly educated, but low-paid, human resources. The scope and objectives of this chapter aim to describe changes in major educational policies in the 60 years since the establishment of the government in 1948; review the quantitative and qualitative development of education; and explore the contribution of educational development to economic progress. The first part of this chapter will overview changes and reforms in educational policies during the last six decades. Next, it will examine the characteristics of Korean education quantitatively and qualitatively. Finally, it will introduce major studies on the contribution of education to productivity and economic growth in Korea.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Middle School Private School Entrance Examination Private Tutoring 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Choi, K.-S. (1997). The Contribution of education to economic growth [in Korean]. The Journal of Economics and Finance in Education, 6(1), 59–63.Google Scholar
  2. Denison, E. F. (1966). Measuring the contribution of education to economic growth. In E.A.G Robinson & J. E. Vaizey (Eds.), The economics of education. New York, NY: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  3. Jeong, C.-Y. (1977). Rates of return on investment in education. In C.-K. Kim (Ed.), Industrial and social development issues (p. 1977). Korea Development Institute: Seoul.Google Scholar
  4. Kim, J.-E. (1973a). An analysis of the national planning process for educational development in the republic of Korea, 1945–1970. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  5. Kim, S.-B. (1973b). A systemic sub-optimization model for educational planning, with reference to Korea. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  6. Kim, S.-B. (1996). Education and economic development in Korea. The Korean Journal of Policy Studies, 11, 1–12.Google Scholar
  7. Korean Educational Administration Society. (2003). Economics of education. Seoul: KEAS.Google Scholar
  8. Korean Educational Development Institute. (2010). Statistical yearbook of education. Seoul: Korean Educational Development Institute.Google Scholar
  9. Lee, C.-J. (2005, May). Pro-poor education policies in Korea: Fifty years of experience. Paper presented at regional policy seminar, in collaboration with the World Bank Institute, Beijing.Google Scholar
  10. Lee, C.-J., Kim, S.-Y., & Adams, D. (Eds.). (2010). Sixty years of korean education. Seoul: Seoul National University Press.Google Scholar
  11. McGinn, N. F., Snodgrass, D. R., Kim, Y. B., Kim, S.-B., & Kim, Q.-Y. (1980). Education and development in Korea. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Ministry of Education. (2000). Education in Korea, 2000–2001. Seoul: Ministry of Education.Google Scholar
  13. Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development. (2001). The 100 MAJOR educational reforms of the People’s government. Seoul: Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development.Google Scholar
  14. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2002). Education Policy Analysis 2002. Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.Google Scholar
  15. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2000). Programme for International Student Assessment report.Google Scholar
  16. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2003). Programme for International Student Assessment report.Google Scholar
  17. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2006). Programme for International Student Assessment report.Google Scholar
  18. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2009). Programme for International Student Assessment report.Google Scholar
  19. Paik, H.-K. (1969). A content analysis of the elementary school textbooks and a related study for improvement of textbook administration. Seoul: Central Education Research Institute.Google Scholar
  20. Song, Byung-Nak. (2003). The rise of the Korean economy (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization. (1974). Republic of Korea: Educational services in a rapidly growing economy. Paris: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Public AdministrationSeoul National UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea

Personalised recommendations