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Bioremediation of Nitroglycerin: State of the Science

  • John PichtelEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

Nitroglycerin [glycerol trinitrate, GTN, C3H5(NO3)3] was discovered in 1847 by Asconio Sobrero, a student at the University of Turin (US Army 1984).

Keywords

Activate Sludge Nitro Group Ammonium Nitrate Digester Sludge Energetic Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ball State UniversityMuncieUSA

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