Advertisement

Institutional and Intellectual Contexts in German Mathematics, 1800–1870

  • José Ferreirós
Chapter
Part of the Science Networks. Historical Studies book series (SNHS, volume 23)

Abstract

As will become clear in the body of the present work, a certain trend within 19th-century German mathematics, the so-called conceptual approach, seems to have been strongly associated with the rise of set theory. Therefore, it seems convenient to start by analyzing two different ‘mathematical styles,’ those that reigned in Göttingen and Berlin immediately after 1855. Such will be the topic of §§4 and 5. The reason for that particular selection of institutions is simple: the main figures in the first two parts of the book are Riemann, Dedekind and Cantor. Riemann and Dedekind studied at Göttingen, where they began their teaching career, while Cantor took his mathematical training from Berlin. It will turn out that the conceptual approach was present at both universities, but in different varieties, that we will identify as an abstract and a formal variety. The abstract conceptual approach that could be found at Göttingen promoted the set-theoretical orientation strongly.

Keywords

Conceptual Approach Algebraic Number Theory German Mathematician Actual Infinity Intellectual Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Nicolas Bourbaki [1950, §1].Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hawkins [1981, 234].Google Scholar
  3. 1.
    Riemann [1854, 255] regarded his discussion of the notion of manifold as “philosophical,” just like Kronecker [1887, 251] his analysis of number. Cantor [1883] entered into the philosophical arena in order to justify his introduction of transfinite numbers, while Dedekind [1888, 336] felt the need to make clear that his “logical” analysis of number did not pressupose any particular “philosophical or mathematical” knowledge.Google Scholar
  4. 2.
    As is well known, the meaning of the German word Wissenschaft is different from that of its English counterpart `science:’ it refers to any academic discipline, including history, philosophy, etc. When I write about the sciences, I mean the Naturwissenschaften — physics, chemistry, biology, etc. It is important to observe that mathematics was sometimes treated as being closer to the humanities in early 19th-century Germany.Google Scholar
  5. 1.
    Prussian university reform was undertaken during French occupacion, and there was a conscious attempt to establish clear counterparts of French cultural orientations: the university would be an exponent of German Kultur as opposed to French civilisation, and in particular the notion of Bildung is opposed to a more utilitarian Ausbildung [formation or instruction]. See [Ringer 1969].Google Scholar
  6. 2.
    Quoted in [Paulsen 1896/97, vol. 2, 209]: “zu einem organischen Ganzen zu vereinigen und zu der Würde einer wohlgeordneten philosophisch-historischen Wissenschaft emporzuheben.”Google Scholar
  7. 3.
    As translated in [Jungnickel and McCormmach 1986, 4].Google Scholar
  8. 1.
    The import of such institutional changes for mathematical research has been carefully studied by Schubring [1983].Google Scholar
  9. 2.
    Schiller, Die Horen (1795), in [Schiller 1980, 280]: “Archimedes und der Schüler.) Zu Archimedes kam ein wissbegieriger Jüngling;/ Weyhe mich, sprach er zu ihm, ein in die göttliche Kunst,/ Die so herrliche Früchte dem Vaterlande getragen,/ Und die Mauern der Stadt vor der Sambuca beschützt./ Göttlich nennst du die Kunst! Sie ist’s, versetzte der Weise,/ Aber das war sie, mein Sohn, eh sie dem Staat noch gedient./ Willst du nur Früchte, die kann auch eine Sterbliche zeugen,/ Wer um die Göttin freyt, suche in ihr nicht das Weib.” Quoted in [Hoffmann, vol. 5, 624]. Jacobi wrote a parody of this poem, that is quoted in [Kronecker 1887, 252]. The `sambuca’ was a war machine used by the Romans against Syracuse, Archimedes’ fatherland.Google Scholar
  10. 3.
    Compare [Scharlau 1981]. I hardly need to make explicit that I am not making a case for a reductionistic explanation: the contextual factor will probably be only one among several others.Google Scholar
  11. 1.
    On Hegel, Fries, Herbart and mathematics, see [König 1990 ].Google Scholar
  12. 2.
    This had negative effects insofar as it implied lack of attention to applied topics and to interconnections between branches, etc. See [Rowe 1989], where the fight against some implications of neohumanism around 1900 is discussed; see especially [186–87, 190].Google Scholar
  13. 1.
    One should indicate, as David Rowe has urged me to do, that the emergence of a mathematical community was not easy, due to the dispersion of professors, their adscription to different universities (with remnants of a guild mentality) and states, etc. The Deutsche Mathematiker Vereinigung was not easy to launch even in 1890.Google Scholar
  14. 2.
    See [Jahnke 1991], and on Kummer [Bekemeier 1987, 196–203].Google Scholar
  15. 3.
    Klein 1926, vol. 1, 114]: “Fragen wir nun nach dem Geist, der diese ganze Entwicklung trägt, so können wir kurz sagen: es ist der naturwissenschaftlich gerichtete Neuhumanismus, der in der unerbittlich strengen Pflege der reinen Wissenschaft sein Ziel sieht und durch einseitige Anspannung aller Kräfte auf dies Ziel hin eine spezialfachliche Hochkultur von zuvor nicht gekannter Blüte erreicht.”Google Scholar
  16. 4.
    No full biography of Dirichlet has yet been written, the best is still Kummer’s obituary (in [Dirichlet 1897, 311–44]). Important archival material can be found in [Biermann 1959].Google Scholar
  17. 1.
    Legendre, who acted as a reviewer of the paper, was able to use Dirichlet’s results for a proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem for the exponent 5.Google Scholar
  18. 2.
    This feature of the Habilitation varied from place to place, but was similar in Breslau and Berlin.Google Scholar
  19. 3.
    On this issue, see [Biermann 1959, 21–29]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  20. 1.
    Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  21. 2.
    As translated in [Wussing 1969, 270], where this passage from Eisenstein’s autobiography, written when he was 20, is quoted in full.Google Scholar
  22. 1.
    Although it has been customary to refer to this trend as the combinatorial school, following 19th-century usage, I shall prefer the word `tradition.’ We reserve `school’ for those institutional arrangements in which small groups of mature mathematicians pursued more or less coherent research programs, joined by a certain style or `philosophy’ of research (in the sense of Hawkins), training advanced students with which they worked side-by-side [see Geison 1981, Servos 1993 ]. On the other hand, `tradition’ seems apt to convey the idea of influence and community of interests and `philosophy,’ but on a looser institutional, geographical and/or temporal basis (see the Introduction).Google Scholar
  23. 2.
    On this topic, see [Netto 1908], [Jahnke 1987; 1990 ]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  24. 1.
    The fact that Ohm’s approach was made rigorous by the differentiation between symbolical and numerical equalities, and the rules of interpretation of the symbolical calculus, has been emphasized by Jahnke [1987]. See also [Bekemeier 1987].Google Scholar
  25. 2.
    Ohm 1853, vii]: “In den verschiedensten Erscheinungen des Kalkuls (der Arithmetik, Algebra, Analysis, u.u.) erblickt der Verf. nicht Eigenschaften der Grössen, sondern Eigenschaften der Operationen, d.h. Akten des VerstandesChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  26. 1.
    A third edition of his Attempt at a completely consistent [consequenten] System of Mathematics (1822) came out in 1853/55.Google Scholar
  27. 2.
    See [Lewis 1977] and [Otte 1989 ]. An interesting, short analysis of Grassmann’s mathematical method can be found in [Nagel 1939, 215–19].Google Scholar
  28. 1.
    Kant 1787, 14]: “eigentliche mathematische Sätze jederzeit Urtheile a priori und nicht empirisch sind, weil sie Nothwendigkeit bei sich fuhren, welche aus der Erfahrung nicht abgenommen werden kann.”Google Scholar
  29. 2.
    Both Cantor [1883, 191–92] and Dedekind [1888, 335] criticized this conception. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  30. 1.
    Quoted in [Grassmann 1894, vol. 3, part 2, 101–02]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  31. 2.
    Mittag-Leffler wrote in 1886: “Kronecker emploie toutes les occasions à dire du mal de Weierstrass et de ses recherches. Il disait même l’autre jour en parlant de lui et Weierstrass que Gauss était peu connu et peu estimé de ses contemporaines, tandis que Hindenburg était le grand géomètre populaire de ce temps en Allemagne” [Dugac 1973, 162]. On Ohm, see [Bekemeier 1987, 77–82].Google Scholar
  32. 3.
    Gauss 1863/1929, vol. 8, 201]: “Nach meiner innigsten Überzeugung hat die Raumlehre zu unserm Wissen a priori eine ganz andere Stellung, wie die reine Grössenlehre; es geht unserer Kenntniss von jener durchaus diejenige vollständige Überzeugung von ihrer Nothwendigkeit (also auch von ihrer absolute Wahrheit) ab, die der letztem eigen ist; wir müssen in Demuth zugeben, dass, wenn die Zahl bloss unseres Geistes Product ist, der Raum auch ausser unserm Geiste eine Realität hat, der wir a priori ihre Gesetze nicht vollständig vorschreiben können.”Google Scholar
  33. 1.
    The case of Riemann is different. He was a perfect example of the abstract trend, and some of his statements could incite logicist conclusions, but he was a careful philosopher and a follower of Herbart. Now, Herbartianism avoids all apriorism, and therefore it is quite incompatible with logicism (see §II.1–2).Google Scholar
  34. 2.
    This topic will be taken up in chapter VII. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  35. 1.
    Bolzano 1851, 7]: “Hegel und seine AnhängerChrw(133) nennen es verächtlich das schlechte Unendliche und wollen noch ein viel höheres, das wahre, das qualitative Unendliche kennen, welches sie namentlich in Gott und überhaupt im Absoluten nur finden.” See Bolzano’s criticisms of Cauchy, Grunert, Fries, etc. in [op.cit., 9–13].Google Scholar
  36. 1.
    The passage is quoted by Bolzano [1851, iii] and Cantor [1932, 179]: “Je suis tellement pour l’infini actuel, qu’au lieu d’admettre que la nature l’abhorre, comme l’on dit vulgairement, je tiens qu’elle l’affecte partout, pour mieux marquer les perfections de son Auteur. Ainsi je crois qu’il n’y a aucune partie de la matière qui ne soit, je ne dis pas divisible, mais actuellement divisée; et par conséquent la moindre particelle doit être considerée comme un monde plein d’une infinité de créatures différentes.”Google Scholar
  37. 2.
    According to Laugwitz [König 1990, 9–12], Leibniz spoke about infinity on three different levels: a popular one, a second for mathematicians, and the third for philosophers. At the second level, which is that of the Nouveaux essays, he favors the potential conception of limits, but at the third he presents the kind of approach that is typical of his Monadologie.Google Scholar
  38. 3.
    See [Riemann 1892, 534–38]. The interrelation that Riemann seeks to establish between psychology and physics is also reminiscent of Leibniz.Google Scholar
  39. 1.
    Dedekind to Weber, March 1875 [Cod. Ms. Riemann 1, 2, 24]: “Was mich betrifft, so bin ich für die stetige materielle Erfüllung des Raumes und die Erklärung der Gravitations-und Lichterscheinigungen im höchsten Grade eingenommenChrw(133) Diese Gedanken hat Riemann sehr früh, nicht erst in seiner letzten Zeit, ergriffenChrw(133) Sein Streben ging ohne Zweifel dahin, den allgemeinsten Principien der Mechanik, die er keineswegs umstossen wollte, bei der Naturerklärung eine neue, natürlichere Auffassung unterzulegen; das Bestreben der Selbsterhaltung und die in den partiellen Differentialgleichungen ausgesprochene Abhängigkeit der Zustandsveränderungen von den nach Zeit und Raum unmittelbar benachbarten Zuständen sollte er als 130 das Ursprüngliche, nicht Abgeleitete angesehen werden. So denke ich mir wenigstens seinen Plan.Chrw(133) Leider ist Alles so lückenhaft!”Google Scholar
  40. 2.
    See [Cantor 1883, especially 177, 206–07], [Cantor 1932, 275–76], [Schoenflies 1927, 20], [Meschkowski 1967, 258–59]. It is worth mentioning that in the 1870s there was a group of theologians who accepted the actual infinite and were important for Cantor — above all Gutberlet and cardinal Franzelin; see [Meschkowski 1967], [Dauben 1979], [Purkert and Ilgauds 1987 ].Google Scholar
  41. 3.
    Gauss 1906, vol. 8, 216]: “Was nun aber Ihren Beweis für 1) betrifft, so protestire ich zuvörderst gegen den Gebrauch einer Unendlichen Grösse als einer Vollendeten, welcher in der Mathematik niemals erlaubt ist. Das Unendliche ist nur eine façon de parler, indem man eigentlich von Grenzen spricht, denen gewisse Verhältnisse so nahe kommen als man will, während andern ohne Einschränkung zu wachsen verstattet ist.”Google Scholar
  42. 1.
    Riemann’s position vis à vis the infinite is analyzed in §íI.4.2. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  43. 1.
    Systematic development of the interdependence among geometrical configurations [Steiner 1832].Google Scholar
  44. 2.
    Steiner 1832, v—vi]: “Chrw(133) organisch zusammenhängendes GanzeChrw(133) Gegenwartige Schrift hat es versucht, den Organismus aufzudeckenChrw(133)” [op.cit., vi]: “Wenn nun wirklich in diesem Werke gleichsam der Gang, den die Natur befolgt, aufgedeckt wirdChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  45. 3.
    Steiner [1832, xiii]: “In der Geraden sind eine unzählige MengeChrw(133) Punkte denkbar.” Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  46. 4.
    Steiner [1832, xiii]: “Der ebene Strahlbüschel. Durch jeden Punkt in einer Ebene sind unzählige Gerade möglich; die Gesammtheit aller solcher Geraden soll „ebener Strahlbüschel”Chrw(133) heissen.“ [Op.cit., xiv]: ”Der Strahlbüschel im RaumChrw(133). Ein solcher Strahlbüschel enthält nicht nur unendlich viele Strahlen, sondern er umfasst auch zahllose ebene Strahlbüschel (II.) und Ebenenbüschel (III.) als untergeordnete Gebilde oder ElementeChrw(133)“Google Scholar
  47. 1.
    Steiner 1832, xiv—xv]: “Zuerst werden eine Gerade und ein ebener Strahlbüschel aufeinander bezogen, so dass ihre Elemente gepaart sind, d.h., dass jedem Punkt der Geraden ein bestimmter Strahl des Strahlbüschels entspricht.”Google Scholar
  48. 2.
    Op.cit., vi]: “den Kern der SacheChrw(133) der darin besteht, dass die Abhängigkeit der Gestalten von einander, und die Art und Weise aufgedeckt wird, wie ihre Eigenschaften von den einfachem Figuren zu den zusammengesetztem sich fortpflanzen.”Google Scholar
  49. 3.
    Op.cit., 266]: The “essence” of collineation consists in that “bei zwei ebenen oder körperlichen Räumen, jedem Puncte des einen Raums ein Punct in dem anderen Raume dergestalt entspricht, dass, wenn man in dem einen Raume eine beliebige Gerade zieht, von allen Puncten, welche von dieser Geraden getroffen werden (collineantur), die entsprechenden Puncte in dem anderen Raume gleichfalls durch eine Gerade verbunden werden können.”Google Scholar
  50. 4.
    See [Klein 1926, vol. 1, 118], and also [Wussing 1969, 35–42], which includes a more detailed discussion of this aspect of Möbius’s work.Google Scholar
  51. 5.
    Although Riemann spent the years 1847–49 at Berlin, apparently he did not attend Steiner’s lectures. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  52. 1.
    As can be seen in the volumes of Göttingen’s Ausleihregister for the summer semester of 1854 and winter semester of 1854/55. He paid particular attention to Möbius, since he borrowed his [1827] in the semesters of 1850/51, 1853, 1854 and 1855. Notably, Möbius calls (finite) sets of points “Systeme von Puncten ” [e.g., 1827, 170]; the word “System,” also used by Riemann and by Dedekind himself in his algebraic work, will finally become his technical term for set in the 1870s (see chapter III and VII).Google Scholar
  53. 2.
    Cantor refers to Vorlesungen über synthetische Geometrie der Kegelschnitte, § 2. Steiner used the term to indicate that two configurations were related by a one-to-one coordination.Google Scholar
  54. 3.
    Klein came to Göttingen in 1886, strongly supported by the minister, with the purpose of building a center that could be compared with Berlin. He remained until 1913, while Hilbert came in 1895, until 1930. See [Rowe 1989 ].Google Scholar
  55. 4.
    Lorey quotes in full a letter from Dedekind with reminiscences from his Göttingen time. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  56. 1.
    Dedekind in [Lorey 1916, 82]: “hat mir die über zwei Semester vertheilte grosse Vorlesung von Weber über Experimentalphysik den tiefsten Eindruck gemacht; die strenge Scheidung zwischen den durch die einfachsten Versuche erkannten fundamentalen Tatsachen und den durch den menschlichen denkenden Geist daran geknüpften Hypothesen gab ein unübertreffliches Vorbild wahrhaft wissenschaftlicher Forschung, wie ich es bis dahin noch niemals kennen gelernt hatte, und namentlich war der Aufbau der Elektrizitätslehre von grossartiger begeisternder WirkungChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  57. 2.
    See [Jungnickel and McCormmach 1986, 138–48]. Webers main work was his Elektrodynamische Maassbestimmungen of 1846.Google Scholar
  58. 1.
    Riemann 1892, 507; emphasis added]: “Meine Hauptarbeit betrifft eine neue Auffassung der bekannten Naturgesetze — Ausdruck derselben mittelst anderer Grundbegriffe — wodurch die Benutzung der experimentellen Data über die Wechselwirkung zwischen Wärme, Licht, Magnetismus und Electricität zur Erforschung ihres Zusammenhangs möglich würde.”Google Scholar
  59. 2.
    Dedekind in [Lorey 1916, 82]. See [Jungnickel and McCormmach 1986, 170–72]. Dirichlet used the call to try getting freed from the heavy teaching at the military academy, but the Prussian ministry reacted too slowly.Google Scholar
  60. 3.
    Lorey 1916, 82–83]: “Chrw(133) womit für das mathematische Studium in Göttingen eine neue Zeit anbrach.Chrw(133) er hat durch seine Lehre, wie durch häufige Gespräche in persönlichen Verkehr, der sich nach und nach immer vertrauter gestaltete, einen neuen Menschen aus mir gemacht. So wirkte er belebend auf seine zahlreiche Schüler einChrw(133)” See also [Scharlau 1981, 35ff].Google Scholar
  61. 1.
    In this case, I avoid the word “school” because there was not a relevant production of advanced students, that would later become research mathematicians (see below).Google Scholar
  62. 2.
    Euler understood by “functiones continuae” those that corresponded to a single analytical expression throughout. See [Youschkevitch 1976].Google Scholar
  63. 3.
    There has been some debate whether Dirichlet ever thought about applying this concept to functions more `arbitrary’ than piecewise continuous functions. The 1837 paper only considers continuous functions, but it is an expository paper published in a physics journal. It seems plausible to me that he entertained the abstract notion of function, but thought that in mathematics there is no need to consider highly arbitrary functions — except as counter-examples.Google Scholar
  64. 1.
    Dirichlet 1889, vol. 2, 2451: “Wenn es die immer mehr hervortretende Tendenz der neueren Analysis ist, Gedanken an die Stelle der Rechnung zu setzenChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  65. 1.
    Dedekind 1930, vol. 2, 54–55]: “Ich erinnere zunächst an eine schöne Stelle der Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, die schon in meiner Jugend den tiefsten Eindruck auf micht gemacht hat. Im Art. 76 berichtet Gauss, dass der Wilsonsche Satz zuerst von Waring bekanntgemacht ist, und fährt fort: Sed neuter demonstrari potuit, et cel. Waring fatetur demonstrationem eo difficiliorem videri, quod nulla notatio fingi possit, quae numerum primum exprimat. — At nostro quidem judicio hujusmodi veritates ex notionibus quam ex notationibus hauriri debebant. — In diesen letzen Worten liegt, wenn sie im allgemeinsten Sinne genommen werden, der Auspruch eines grossen wissenschaftlichen Gedankens, die Entscheidung für das Innerliche im Gegensatz zu dem Äusserlichen. Dieser Gegensatz wiederholt sich auch in der Mathematik auf fast allen Gebieten; man denke nur an die Funktionentheorie, an Riemanns Definition der Funktionen durch innerliche charakteristische Eigenschaften, aus welchen die äusserlichen Darstellungsformen mit Notwendigkeit entspringen. Aber auch auf dem bei weitem enger begrenzten und einfacheren Gebiete der Idealtheorie kommen beide Richtungen zur GeltungChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  66. 2.
    Dedekind 1930, vol. 3, 296]: “une telle théorie, fondée sur le calcul, n’offrirait pas encore, ce me semble, le plus haut degré de perfection; il est preférable, comme dans la théorie moderne des fonctionsChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  67. 3.
    Dedekind to Lipschitz, June 1876, in [Dedekind 1930/32, vol. 3, 468]: “Mein Streben in der Zahlentheorie geht dahin, die Forschung nicht auf zufällige Darstellungsformen oder Ausdrücke sondern auf einfache Grundbegriffe zu stützen und hierdurch — wenn diese Vergleichung auch vielleicht anmassend klingen mag — auf diesem Gebiete etwas Ähnliches zu erreichen, wie Riemann auf dem Gebiete der Functionentheorie.”Google Scholar
  68. 1.
    Riemann 1892, 38–39]: “Eine Theorie dieser Functionen auf den hier gelieferten Grundlagen würde die Gestaltung der Function (d.h. ihren Werth fir jeden Werth ihres Arguments) unabhängig von einer Bestimmungsweise derselben durch Grössenoperationen festlegen, indem zu den allgemeinen Begriffe einer Function einer veränderlichen complexen Grösse nur die zur Bestimmung der Function nothwendigen Merkmale hinzugefügt würden, und dann erst zu den verschiedenen Ausdrücken deren die Function fähig ist übergehen.”Google Scholar
  69. 2.
    The reason for the name is that Cauchy had already recognized that a complex function is analytic if and only if it is differentiable, although he did not use the differential equations as a definition.Google Scholar
  70. 1.
    Klein tried to bring farther the tradition of Gauss and Riemann, but he conceived for himself a role that was much broader and more ambitious than that of a school leader. And the impressive number of mathematicians who studied with Hilbert may not constitute a school, strictly speaking. For details and nuances concerning this period, the reader should consult [Rowe 1989 ].Google Scholar
  71. 2.
    He was strongly influenced by Riemann’s work and by his collaboration with Dedekind (chap. III), and led an active academic career in Königsberg (where he counted Hilbert among his students), Göttingen and Strassburg, among other places. He was also extremely influential through several important textbooks.Google Scholar
  72. 1.
    The name was coined in the 19th-century, and it is interesting to consider that, by then, the word “school” frequently had a negative ring, connoting a one-sided orientation. In this case, it may have also referred to the extremely powerful position of the school in academic matters.Google Scholar
  73. 2.
    His purpose was to make him a professor at a new Polytechnical School that he was attempting to launch, as happened with Dirichlet and Abel later. Dirichlet was the only one who actually came to Berlin, becoming a professor at the University after Humboldt’s plans failed. See [Biermann 1973, 21–27].Google Scholar
  74. 3.
    Steiner (see §3) was also a protegé of Humboldt and Crelle. He became an extraordinary professor and member of the Berlin Academy of Sciences in 1834.Google Scholar
  75. 4.
    University professors customarily were members of the Academy. Among the mathematicians, this was only false for M. Ohm [see Biermann 1973 ].Google Scholar
  76. 1.
    See Biermann’s biography in [Gillispie 1981, vol. 7], or [Bierman 1973 ]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  77. 2.
    It would require a careful analysis to ascertain the depth of this influence, but it is clear from the outset that Weierstrass did not treat series in a purely formal way, as the combinatorialists, but rather viewed them in the `conceptual’ way of Abel and Cauchy (see [Jahnke 1987; 1991]). On the other hand, he was of the opinion that not all traits of the “combinatorial school” had been lost, as Hilbert recorded in his 1888 trip to Berlin (quoted in [Rowe 1995, 546]).Google Scholar
  78. 1.
    As quoted by Bermann in [Gillispie 1981, vol. 7, 523]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  79. 2.
    Dirichlet 1889, vol. 2, 245]: “Es war nicht seine Sache, Fertiges und Ueberliefertes von neuem zu überliefern, seine Vorlesungen bewegten sich sämmtlich ausserhalb des Gebietes der Lehrbücher, und unfassten nur diejenigen Theile der Wissenschaft, in denen er selbst schaffend aufgetreten warChrw(133)”Google Scholar
  80. 1.
    It is likely that Ohm’s ideas were influential on Weierstrass and Dedekind, in both cases before 1855, i.e., before they established closer contact with leading mathematicians. This would explain similarities in their treatment of the elements of arithmetic (chapter IV). As we saw, Weierstrass may have been influenced by the combinatorial tradition, to which Ohm was close; Dedekind’s teacher Stern was also influenced by Ohm and the combinatorialists, and his Habilitation lecture of 1854 is strongly reminiscent of Ohm (see alsoGoogle Scholar
  81. 2.
    See [Biermann 1973] [Dugac 1973, 141–46, 161–63]. By 1884, Kronecker was promising to show the “incorrectness” [Unrichtigkeit] of all those reasonings with which “so-called analysis” [die sogenannte Analysis] works [Dauben 1979, 314]. Such comments affected Weierstrass strongly, and led him to fear that his mathematical style would disappear after his death, but he did not have the strength to defend his viewpoint publicly.Google Scholar
  82. 3.
    As translated in [Hawkins 1981, 237]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  83. 1.
    Meschkowski 1969, 68]: “All solche allgemeinen Sätze haben ihre Schlupfwinkel, wo sie nicht mehr gelten.” But here he was referring to the Bolzano—Weierstrass theorem!Google Scholar
  84. 2.
    On Weierstrass’s theory, see [Dugac 1973] and [Bottazzini 1986 ]. Letter of 1846, in [Pieper 1897, 99]: “Er allein, nicht ich, nicht Cauchy, nicht Gauss weiss, was ein vollkommen strenger mathematischer Beweis ist, sondern wir kennen es erst von ihmChrw(133). D[irichlet] hat es vorgezogen, sich hauptsächlich mit solchen Gegenständen zu beschäftigen, welche die grössten Schwierigkeiten darbieten; darum liegen seine Arbeiten nicht so auf der breiten Heerstrasse der Wissenschaft und haben daher, wenn auch grosse Anerkennung, doch nicht alle die gefunden, welche sie verdienen.”Google Scholar
  85. 1.
    Kronecker 1887, 253]: “Und ich glaube auch, dass es dereinst gelingen wird, den gerammten Inhalt aller dieser mathematischen Disziplinen zu `arithmetisieren,’ d.h. einzig und allein auf den im engsten Sinne genommenen Zahlbegriff zu gründen, also die Modification und Erweiterungen dieses Begriffs [Ich meine hier namentlich die Hinzunahme der irrationalen sowie der continuirlichen Grössen] wieder abzustreifen, welche zumeist durch die Anwendungen auf die Geometrie und Mechanik veranlasst worden ist.”Google Scholar
  86. 2.
    Meschkowski 1967, 68]: “Kronecker erklärteChrw(133) die Bolzanoschen Schlüsse als offenbare Trugschlüsse” “dass man Funktionen wird aufstellen können, die so unvernünftig sind, dass sie trotz des Zutreffens von Weierstrass’ Voraussetzungen keine obere Grenze haben.” See [op.cit., 239–40].Google Scholar
  87. 1.
    By the 1880s, as a result of theoretical differences mixed with personal difficulties, Cantor came to feel confronted with the Berlin school as a whole. In an 1895 letter to Hermite, he denied being a member of the school and stated that the mathematician he felt closer to was Dirichlet [Purkert and Ilgauds 1987, 195–96].Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Ferreirós
    • 1
  1. 1.Dpto. de Filosofía y Lógica, Avda. San Francisco Javier, s/nUniversidad de SevillaSevillaSpain

Personalised recommendations