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Approaches to Developing Urban Wastelands as Elements of Green Infrastructure

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Part of the Cities and Nature book series (CITIES)

Abstract

For cities, it is essential to have richly structured and multifunctional green systems which satisfy ecological needs and at the same time are attractive, usable, low cost or even profitable. Indeed, it is doubtful that sufficient green infrastructure can be realized solely by pursuing traditional models of green space development. At a time of changing demands, constrained public finances and limited urban space, new and unusual types of green spaces can supplement traditional elements of urban green infrastructure. Urban wastelands with their various stages of vegetation can provide a number of ecosystem services to tackle challenges such as stopping the loss of biodiversity, adapting to climate change and creating recreational and healthy urban environments. The conservation of spontaneous biotopes, on the one hand, and the active greening of urban wastelands, on the other, offer the potential to develop urban green systems that provide a range of essential ecological, social and aesthetic services. This chapter outlines the potential of urban wastelands to supplement urban green infrastructure. We consider how different “designs” of urban wastelands are perceived and used by residents. Based on findings regarding biodiversity, ecosystem services and the perception/acceptance of vegetation-covered wastelands, various planning and development approaches are presented.

Keywords

  • Urban ecosystem services
  • Urban biodiversity
  • Landscape planning
  • Urban green spaces
  • Urban wastelands

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Fig. 1

Source Modified after Plappert 2013)

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(Source Modified after Banse and Mathey 2013)

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(Source Modified after Banse and Mathey 2013; photomontages: Tittel, Wahl; background Volz)

Fig. 5

(Source Modified after Banse and Mathey 2013)

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Fig. 8

(Source Modified after Mathey et al. 2003)

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Mathey, J., Rößler, S. (2021). Approaches to Developing Urban Wastelands as Elements of Green Infrastructure. In: Di Pietro, F., Robert, A. (eds) Urban Wastelands. Cities and Nature. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-74882-1_13

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