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Characterizing Driver Workload and Attention in a Simulated Automated Vehicle

Conference paper
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Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 1206)

Abstract

As automated vehicles become more widely available, it is essential that we understand how workload and gaze distribution change throughout a drive. This work provides an understanding of workload and gaze distribution throughout two simulated automated drives. The first drive, the baseline, participants experienced fully functioning automation. During the second drive, the handover drive, participants experienced an automation failure which required them to take manual control of the vehicle. The results of this work can be used to understand the impact of interventions such as automation reliability displays and take over requests on the driver.

Keywords

Driving simulation Automated vehicles Visual attention Eye tracking Workload 

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of PsychologyGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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