Advertisement

The Absent Arendt

  • Rebecca DewEmail author
Chapter
  • 45 Downloads
Part of the International Political Theory book series (IPoT)

Abstract

My opening chapter sets the stage for an intellectual survey of Hannah Arendt’s thought in consideration of, on the one hand, her complex relationships with existentialists, inclusive of her mentors, and modernity’s philosophical ramifications simultaneous with and consequent to these. The first chapter outlines my aims in addition to relevant literature. I then make introductory observations as to Arendt’s intellectual formation, the atypicality of Arendt’s existentialism, her disassociation from the gamut of professional thinkers, her stance in relation to the modern continuum and the (dis)similarities of her thought to that of her mentors, Heidegger and most notably Jaspers.

Keywords

Hannah Arendt Ideology Karl Jaspers Modernity Political philosophy 

References

  1. Allen, Amy. 1999. Solidarity after Identity Politics: Hannah Arendt and the Power of Feminist Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25: 97–118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Arendt, Hannah. 1956. Authority in the Twentieth Century. The Review of Politics 18: 403–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Arendt, Hannah. 1958. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  4. Arendt, Hannah. 1967. The Origins of Totalitarianism. London: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  5. Arendt, Hannah. 1968. Between Past and Future: Eight Exercises in Political Thought. New York: Viking Press.Google Scholar
  6. Arendt, Hannah. 1973. On Revolution. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  7. Arendt, Hannah. 1978. The Life of the Mind, vol. II, “On Willing.” London: Secker & Warburg.Google Scholar
  8. Arendt, Hannah. 1996. Love and Saint Augustine, ed. J. Scott and J. Stark. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  9. Arendt, Hannah. 2005. What Is Existential Philosophy? In Essays in Understanding: Formation, Exile, and Totalitarianism, 1930–1954, ed. J. Kohn. New York: Schocken Books.Google Scholar
  10. Arendt, Hannah. 2007. The Great Tradition: 1. Law and Power. Social Research 74: 713–726.Google Scholar
  11. Arendt, Hannah. 2013. ‘What Remains? The Language Remains’: A Conversation with Günter Gaus. In The Last Interview and Other Conversations. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House.Google Scholar
  12. Arendt, Hannah, and Jerome Kohn. 1954. Essays in Understanding, 1930–1954: Formation, Exile, and Totalitarianism. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Co.Google Scholar
  13. Arendt, Hannah, and Jerome Kohn. 2005. The Promise of Politics. New York: Schocken Books.Google Scholar
  14. Arendt, Hannah and Liliane Weissberg. 1997. Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Arnett, Ronald. 2012. Communication Ethics in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt’s Rhetoric of Warning and Hope. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Aron, Raymond. 1994. The Essence of Totalitarianism According to Hannah Arendt. In Defense of Political Reason: Essays by Raymond Aron, ed. D.J. Mahoney. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.Google Scholar
  17. Baehr, Peter. 2008. The ‘Masses’ in Hannah Arendt’s Theory of Totalitarianism. The Good Society 16: 12–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Baehr, Peter. 2009. The Fabrication of Man. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2): 121–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Baehr, Peter. 2010. Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Beiner, Ronald. 2001. Rereading Hannah Arendt’s Kant Lectures. In Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt, ed. R. Beiner and J. Nedelsky. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  21. Beiner, Ronald, and Jennifer Nedelsky. 2001. Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  22. Benhabib, Seyla. 1988. Judgment and the Moral Foundations of Politics in Arendt’s Thought. Political Theory 16: 29–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Benhabib, Seyla. 1990. Hannah Arendt and the Redemptive Power of Narrative. Social Research 57: 167–196.Google Scholar
  24. Benhabib, Seyla. 2000. Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem. In The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt, ed. D. Villa, 65–85. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Benhabib, Seyla. 2001. Judgment and Politics in Arendt’s Thought. In Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt, ed. R. Beiner and J. Nedelsky. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  26. Benhabib, Seyla. 2003. The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  27. Benhabib, Seyla. 2010. Politics in Dark Times: Encounters with Hannah Arendt. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Bernstein, Richard. 1997. Provocation and Appropriation: Hannah Arendt’s Response to Martin Heidegger. Constellations 4: 153–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Buckler, Steve. 2011. Hannah Arendt and Political Theory: Challenging the Tradition. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Calhoun, Craig. 1997. Plurality, Promises, and Public Spaces. In Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics, ed. C. Calhoun and J. McGowan. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  31. Calhoun, Craig, and John McGowan. 1997. Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics, vol. 6. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  32. Cane, Lucy. 2015. Hannah Arendt on the Principles of Political Action. European Journal of Political Theory 14: 55–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Canovan, Margaret. 1974. The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt. London: Dent.Google Scholar
  34. Canovan, Margaret. 1992. Hannah Arendt: A Reinterpretation of Her Political Thought. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Canovan, Margaret. 2000. Arendt’s Theory of Totalitarianism: A Reassessment. In The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt, ed. D.R. Villa. New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Cascardi, Anthony. 1997. Communication and Transformation: Aesthetics and Politics in Kant and Arendt. In Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics, ed. C. Calhoun and J. McGowan. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  37. Cerbone, David. 2008. Heidegger: A Guide for the Perplexed. New York and London: Continuum.Google Scholar
  38. Condren, Conal. 2011. Reason of State and Sovereignty in Early Modern England: A Question of Ideology? Parergon 28 (2): 5–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Cotkin, George. 2007. Illuminating Evil: Hannah Arendt and Moral History. Modern Intellectual History 4: 463–490.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Court, Anthony. 2009. Hannah Arendt’s Response to the Crisis of Her Times. Amsterdam and Pretoria: Rozenberg.Google Scholar
  41. Dallmayr, Fred. 1984. Ontology of Freedom: Heidegger and Political Philosophy. Political Theory 12: 203–234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. D’Entrèves, Maurizio. 1991. Modernity and the Human Condition: Hannah Arendt’s Conception of Modernity. Thesis Eleven 30: 75–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. D’Entrèves, Maurizio. 1994. The Political Philosophy of Hannah Arendt. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Dew, Rebecca. 2016. Filling That Moral Space: Forgiveness, Suffering and the Recognition of Human Identity. In The Philosophy of Forgiveness, vol. I, ed. C. D. Lewis. Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press.Google Scholar
  45. Dietz, Mary G. 2000. Arendt and the Holocaust. In The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt, ed. D.R. Villa. New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Diprose, Rosalyn. 2010. Arendt on Responsibility, Sensibility and Democratic Pluralism. In Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt, ed. A. Schaap, D. Celermajer, and V. Karalēs. Farnham, England and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  47. Dostal, Robert. 1984. Judging Human Action: Arendt’s Appropriation of Kant. Review of Metaphysics 37: 725–755.Google Scholar
  48. Dreyfus, Hubert. 1993. Heidegger and the Connection Between Knowledge, Art, Technology, and Politics. In The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger, ed. C.B. Guignon. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Ettinger, Elżbieta. 1997. Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Ferry, Luc, and Alain Renaut. 1990. Heidegger and Modernity. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  51. Formosa, Paul. 2010. Thinking, Conscience and Acting in Times of Crises. In Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt, ed. A. Schaap, D. Celermajer, and V. Karalēs. Farnham, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  52. Grumett, David. 2000. Arendt, Augustine and Evil. The Heythrop Journal 41: 154–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Guignon, Charles B. 1993. The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Habermas, Jürgen. 1984. The Theory of Communicative Action. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  55. Habermas, Jürgen. 1990. Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  56. Habermas, Jürgen. 2003. The Future of Human Nature. Malden, MA: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  57. Halberstam, Michael. 2001. Hannah Arendt on the Totalitarian Sublime and Its Promise of Freedom. In Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, ed. S. Aschheim. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  58. Hayden, Patrick. 2014. Hannah Arendt: Key Concepts. Durham: Acumen Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Heller, Agnes. 2001. Hannah Arendt on Tradition and New Beginnings. In Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, ed. S. Aschheim, 19–32. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Hinchman, Lewis and Sandra Hinchman. 1991. Existentialism Politicized: Arendt’s Debt to Jaspers. The Review of Politics 53: 435–468.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Hunter, Ian. 2001. Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Germany, vol. 60. New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Hunter, Ian. 2014. Religious Freedom in Early Modern Germany: Theology, Philosophy, and Legal Casuistry. South Atlantic Quarterly 113: 37–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Hammer, Dean. 2000. Freedom and Fatefulness: Augustine, Arendt and the Journey of Memory. Theory, Culture & Society 17: 83–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Ingram, David. 1988. The Postmodern Kantianism of Arendt and Lyotard. The Review of Metaphysics 42: 51–77.Google Scholar
  65. Jaspers, Karl. 1953. The Origin and Goal of History. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  66. Jaspers, Karl. 1978. Man in the Modern Age. New York: AMS Press.Google Scholar
  67. Kaplan, Morris. 1995. Refiguring the Jewish Question: Arendt, Proust, and the Politics of Sexuality. In Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, ed. B. Honig. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  68. Kateb, George. 1984. Hannah Arendt: Politics, Conscience, Evil. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: M. Robertson.Google Scholar
  69. Kateb, George. 1987. Death and Politics: Hannah Arendt’s Reflections on the American Constitution. Social Research 54: 605–616.Google Scholar
  70. Kateb, George. 2000. Political Action: Its Nature and Advantages. In The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt, ed. D. Villa, 130–148. New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Kateb, George. 2001. The Judgment of Arendt. In Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt, ed. R. Beiner and J. Nedelsky. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  72. Kateb, George. 2007. Existential Values in Arendt’s Treatment of Evil and Morality. Social Research 74: 811–854.Google Scholar
  73. Kattago, Siobhan. 2014. Hannah Arendt on the World. In Hannah Arendt: Key Concepts, ed. P. Hayden. Durham: Acumen Publishing.Google Scholar
  74. Kierkegaard, Søren, and Alexander Dru. 2010. The Present Age: On the Death of Rebellion. New York and London: Harper Perennial Modern Thought.Google Scholar
  75. Kohn, Jerome. 2001a. The World of Hannah Arendt. New School University, Hannah Arendt Centre Essay. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/arendthtml/essay1.html. Accessed 11 Nov 2014.
  76. Kohn, Jerome. 2001b. Totalitarianism: The Inversion of Politics. New School University, Hannah Arendt Centre Essay. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/arendthtml/essayb1.html. Accessed 11 Nov 2014.
  77. Kohn, Jerome. 2001c. Evil: The Crime Against Humanity. New School University, Hannah Arendt Centre Essay. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/arendthtml/essayc1.html. Accessed 11 Nov 2014.
  78. Kohn, Jerome. 2007. Guest Editor’s Introduction. Social Research 74: xiii–xxi. Google Scholar
  79. Kristeva, Julia, and Frank Collins. 2001. Hannah Arendt: Life Is a Narrative. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. La Caze, Marguerite. 2007. At the Intersection: Kant, Derrida, and the Relation between Ethics and Politics. Political Theory 35: 781–805.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. La Caze, Marguerite. 2010. The Judgment of the Statesperson. In Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt, ed. A. Schaap, D. Celermajer, and V. Karalis, 73–86. Burlinton, VT: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  82. La Caze, Marguerite. 2013. Wonder and Generosity: Their Role in Ethics and Politics. New York, NY: State University of New York Press (SUNY).Google Scholar
  83. Lang, Anthony, and John Williams. 2005. Hannah Arendt and International Relations: Readings Across the Lines. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Lyotard, Jean-Francois. 1984. The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge, trans. G. Bennington and B. Massumi. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  85. Mack, Michael. 2010. Hannah Arendt’s Philosophy of Plurality: Thinking and Understanding and Eichmann in Jerusalem. In Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt, ed. A. Schaap, D. Celermajer, and V. Karalēs. Farnham, England and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  86. Mahoney, Daniel J. (ed.). 1994. Defense of Political Reason: Essays by Raymond Aron. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.Google Scholar
  87. McKinlay, Patrick. 1997. Review of The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt, by Seyla Benhabib. The Review of Politics 59: 930–934.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Mulhall, Stephen. 2005. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Heidegger and Being and Time. Milton Park and Abingdon, OX: Routledge.Google Scholar
  89. Riley, Patrick. 1992. Hannah Arendt on Kant, Truth, and Politics. In Essays on Kant’s Political Philosophy, ed. H. Williams. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  90. Robins, Corey. 2007. Dragon-Slayers. London Review of Books.Google Scholar
  91. Schaap, Andrew. 2005. Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Transitional Justice. In Hannah Arendt and International Relations: Readings Across the Lines, ed. A. Lang and J. Williams. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  92. Schaap, Andrew, Danielle Celermajer, and Vrasidas Karalēs. 2010. Power, Judgment and Political Evil: In Conversation with Hannah Arendt. Farnham, England and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
  93. Swift, Simon. 2013. Hannah Arendt, Violence and Vitality. European Journal of Social Theory 16: 357–376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Taminaux, Jacques. 1992. La fille de Thrace et le penseur professional: Arendt et Heidegger. Paris: Editions Payot.Google Scholar
  95. Villa, Dana. 1996. Arendt and Heidegger: The Fate of the Political. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  96. Villa, Dana. 1997. Hannah Arendt: Modernity, Alienation, and Critique. In Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics, ed. C. Calhoun and J. McGowan. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  97. Villa, Dana. 1998. Seyla Benhabib, The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt. Ethics 108 (4): 817–820.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Villa, Dana (ed.). 2000. The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt. New York and Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  99. Villa, Dana. 2007. Arendt, Heidegger, and the Tradition. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74: 983–1002.Google Scholar
  100. Villa, Dana. 2011. Apologist or Critic? On Arendt’s Relation to Heidegger. Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, 325–337. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Google Scholar
  101. Voegelin, Eric. 1953. Review of The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt. The Review of Politics 15: 66–85.Google Scholar
  102. Vowinckel, Annette. 2001. Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger: History and Metahistory. In Hannah Arendt in Jerusalem, ed. S. Aschheim, 338–346. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Wellmer, Albrecht. 2001. Hannah Arendt on Judgment. In Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt, ed. R. Beiner and J. Nedelsky, 165–182. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  104. Williams, Gareth. 2015. Disclosure and Responsibility in Arendt’s The Human Condition. European Journal of Political Theory 14: 37–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Young-Bruehl, Elisabeth. 1982. Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  106. Zimmerman, Michael. 1990. Heidegger’s Confrontation with Modernity: Technology, Politics, and Art. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Florida LegislatureUSA

Personalised recommendations