Advertisement

Pragmatist Transcendence

  • Tracy Llanera
Chapter
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter presents how the problem of nihilism can be outgrown by reconstructing the conceptual resources available in Rorty’s pragmatism. While Rorty is against the traditional ambition to (upper case) transcendence, his metaphilosophy shows great respect for pre-philosophical impulses aimed at transcendence of some kind, in particular the romantic experience of awe at something greater than oneself and the utopian striving for a radically better world. These impulses do not disappear in Rorty’s metaphilosophy but are reshaped in a pragmatist iteration of transcendence which can be characterized as horizontal (rather than vertical) and weak (rather than strong). This characterization also distinguishes Rorty’s pragmatism from other accounts that share a post-metaphysical ambition to transcendence.

References

  1. Apel, Karl-Otto. 1973. Transformation der Philosophie, I–II. Suhrkamp: Frankfurt am Main.Google Scholar
  2. ———. 1976. The Problem of Philosophical Ultimate Justification in the Light of a Transcendental Pragmatic of Language. Ajatus 36: 142–165.Google Scholar
  3. Chin, Clayton. 2018. The Practice of Political Theory: Rorty and Continental Thought. New York: Columbia University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Curtis, William. 2015. Defending Rorty: Pragmatism and Liberal Virtue. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dews, Peter. 2010. “The Infinite Is Losing Its Charm”: Richard Rorty’s Philosophy of Religion and the Conflict Between Therapeutic and Pragmatic Critique. In The Philosophy of Richard Rorty, ed. Randall Auxier and Lewis Edwin Hahn, 635–655. Chicago: Open Court.Google Scholar
  6. Dieleman, Susan, David Rondel, and Christopher Voparil, eds. 2017. Pragmatism and Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Habermas, Jürgen. 1984. The Theory of Communicative Action, Vol. 1, Reason and the Rationalization of Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. ———. 1992. Postmetaphysical Thinking. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  9. ———. 2001. The Liberating Power of Symbols. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. ———. 2002. Religion and Rationality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  11. ———. 2008. ‘...And to Define America, Her Athletic Democracy’: The Philosopher and the Language Shaper; In Memory of Richard Rorty. New Literary History 39 (1): 3–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hood, Robert. 1998. Rorty and Postmodern Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 20 (2): 183–193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kuipers, Ronald. 2013. Richard Rorty. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  14. Levinas, Emmanuel. 1969. Totality and Infinity. Pittsburgh: University of Duquesne Press.Google Scholar
  15. ———. 1981. Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence. The Hague: Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  16. McClean, David. 2016. Richard Rorty, Liberalism and Cosmopolitanism. Abingdon, Oxon; New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Mendieta, Eduardo, ed. 2005. Introduction. In Take Care of Freedom and Truth Will Take Care of Itself: Interviews with Richard Rorty, xi–xxx. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Nagel, Thomas. 1986. The View from Nowhere. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Ramberg, Bjørn. 2014. Irony’s Commitment: Rorty’s Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. The European Legacy 19 (2): 144–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Rondel, David. 2011. Rorty’s Evangelical Metaphilosophy. Philosophy & Rhetoric 44 (2): 150–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Rorty, Richard. 1982. Consequences of Pragmatism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  22. ———. 1989. Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. ———. 1990. Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. ———. 1991. Essays on Heidegger and Others. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. ———. 1995. Philosophy and the Future. In Rorty and Pragmatism: The Philosopher Responds to His Critics, ed. Herman Saatkamp Jr., 197–206. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press.Google Scholar
  26. ———. 1996. Response to Simon Critchley. In Deconstruction and Pragmatism, ed. Chantal Mouffe, 41–46. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  27. ———. 1998a. Achieving Our Country: Leftist Thought in Twentieth Century America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  28. ———. 1998b. Truth and Progress. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. ———. 1999. Philosophy and Social Hope. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  30. ———. 2005. The Future of Religion with Gianni Vattimo. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  31. ———. 2007. Philosophy as Cultural Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. ———. 2010a. An Ethics for Today: Finding Common Ground Between Philosophy and Religion. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  33. ———. 2010b. Freud and Moral Reflection. In The Rorty Reader, ed. Christopher Voparil and Richard J. Bernstein, 259–278. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  34. ———. 2010c. Reply to Jeffrey Stout. In The Philosophy of Richard Rorty, ed. Randall Auxier and Lewis Edwin Hahn, 546–549. Chicago: Open Court.Google Scholar
  35. Sagoff, Mark. 1988. The Economy of the Earth: Philosophy, Law, and the Environment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Sekyi-Otu, Ato. 2019. Left Universalism, Africacentric Essays. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  37. Smith, Nicholas. 2005. Rorty on Religion and Hope. Inquiry 48 (1): 76–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. ———. 2008. Levinas, Habermas, and Modernity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (6): 643–664.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Smith, Nicholas, and Tracy Llanera. 2019. Pragmatist Transcendence in Rorty’s Metaphilosophy. Special issue on Richard Rorty. Analyse & Kritik 41 (1): 97–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Taylor, Charles. 2001. The Immanent Counter-Enlightenment. In Canadian Political Philosophy, ed. Ronald Beiner and W.J. Norman, 386–400. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Vattimo, Gianni, and P.A. Rovatti. 1983. Il Pensiero debole. Milano: Feltrinelli.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tracy Llanera
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

Personalised recommendations