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Towards a Marine Socio-ecology of Learning in the South West of England

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Part of the Environmental Discourses in Science Education book series (EDSE, volume 6)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the opportunities and challenges of collaborative and participatory working across a range of stakeholders groups – scientists, fishers, and the local community – to address issues of social, environmental and economic sustainability within coastal fishing communities. Using key concepts in ‘social learning for sustainability’, the particular case study of the Lyme Bay Marine Protected Area highlights key themes of ‘social learning’ undertaken by the various stakeholder groups. Personal narratives by key personnel engaged in a particular Citizen Science research initiative provides insight into the personal and professional motivations and learning outcomes from engaging in such work, as well as broader societal impacts.

Keywords

Social learning for sustainability Marine citizen science Ocean literacy Communities of practice Social learning theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of EducationUniversity of PlymouthPlymouthUK
  2. 2.Marine InstituteUniversity of PlymouthPlymouthUK

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