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The Principle of Responsibility

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Part of the Contemporary Issues in Technology Education book series (CITE)

Abstract

In the opening years of the third millennium, technology is ubiquitous with its influence becoming even more predominant with developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and the Internet of things (IoT). However, concerns about technological omnipresence have resulted in an emerging debate on what constitutes responsible design and innovation. This chapter will contribute to the discourse by presenting the philosophy of Edith Stein and her work on empathy, a vital step in the process of design and innovation. It will also propose that the concept of the ethical face-to-face of the Other, formulated by Emmanuel Levinas, can complement Stein’s work. The chapter will provide groundwork for including the principle of responsibility in the teaching of design and innovation.

Keywords

Responsible innovation (RI) Responsible research and innovation (RRI) Empathy Edith Stein Ethics The other Emmanuel Levinas 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Galway-Mayo Institute of TechnologyGalwayIreland

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