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Introduction

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Part of the Contemporary Issues in Technology Education book series (CITE)

Abstract

This book is about design and innovation – what it is and how to teach it. The blending of design and innovation is having an increasing impact not only on the world of product and services but on a wide variety of disciplines such as information and communications technology (ICT), business, education and medicine. However, there is a lack of books on teaching the subject despite the significant growth of interest in both the workplace and academia. This book will address this gap by outlining foundational principles for the teaching of design and innovation and by offering a practical process for implementing the pedagogy. The chapter initially introduces the concepts of design, innovation and design-driven innovation. The teaching approach is then presented in the context of team-based learning. Finally, the layout of the book is outlined with a synopsis of each chapter.

Keywords

Teaching design Teaching innovation Design thinking Design pedagogy Team-based learning Simulation and learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Galway-Mayo Institute of TechnologyGalwayIreland

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