Advertisement

Imagination, Australian Cultural History and Outdoor Environmental Education: Bushwalking as Time Travel

Chapter
  • 284 Downloads
Part of the International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education book series (IEOEE)

Abstract

In this plateau I reflect on my pedagogical practice and explore the role of imagination as a teaching and learning strategy while undertaking bushwalks focused on Australian cultural history. I draw on the Deleuzo-Guattarian concept of lines of flight (a small act of deterritorialization) to consider how aspects of a place might be understood through imagination. I review aspects of the education research literature dedicated to the role of imagination within learning. I briefly explore how imagination has shaped the European settlement of Australia. And I share some of my pedagogical approaches to using imagination to read and understand the cultural history landscapes of central Victoria. The role of imagination in outdoor learning, I argue, is a neglected corner of research that warrants further consideration as a means to extend the learning of students in outdoor environmental education.

Keywords

Lines of flight Deleuze and Guattari Bushwalking Imagination Outdoor environmental education 

References

  1. Abram, D. (1996). The spell of the sensuous: Perception and language in the more-than-human world. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  2. Attwood, B. (1999). ‘My country’: A history of the Djadja Wurrung 1837–1864. Clayton, Australia: Monash Publications in History.Google Scholar
  3. Bannear, D. (1993). Historic mining sites in the Castlemaine/Fryers Creek mining divisions. Bendigo, Australia: Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.Google Scholar
  4. Barrow, R. (1988). Some observations of the concept of imagination. In K. Egan & D. Nadaner (Eds.), Imagination and education (pp. 79–90). Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Blainey, G. (2003). The rush that never ended: A history of Australian mining (5th ed.). Carlton, Australia: Melbourne University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Blainey, G. (2006). A history of Victoria. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bonyhady, T. (2000). The colonial earth. Carlton South, Australia: Melbourne University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Bowden, K. M. (1974). Doctors and diggers on the Mount Alexander goldfields. Maryborough, Australia: K.M. Bowden.Google Scholar
  9. Brookes, A. (2002). Lost in the Australian bush: Outdoor education as curriculum. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 34(4), 405–425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Brookes, A. (2003a). Outdoor education fatalities in Australia 1960-2002. Part 1. Summary of incidents and introduction to fatality analysis. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 7(1), 20–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Brookes, A. (2003b). Outdoor education fatalities in Australia 1960-2002. Part 2. Contributing circumstances: Supervision, first aid, and rescue. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 7(2), 34–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Brookes, A. (2004). Outdoor education fatalities in Australia 1960-2002. Part 3. Environmental circumstances. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 8(1), 22–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Brookes, A. (2007a). Preventing death and serious injury from falling trees and branches. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 11(2), 50–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Brookes, A. (2007b). Research update: Outdoor education fatalities in Australia. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 11(1), 3–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Brookes, A. (2011a). Preventing fatal incidents in outdoor education. Lessons learnt from the Mangatepopo tragedy. New Zealand Journal of Outdoor Education, 2(6), 7–32.Google Scholar
  16. Brookes, A. (2011b). Research update 2010: Outdoor education fatalities in Australia. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 15(1), 35–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Brookes, A. (2015). Outdoor education, safety and risk in the light of serious accidents. In B. Humberstone, H. Prince, & K. A. Henderson (Eds.), Routledge international handbook of outdoor studies (pp. 444–454). London: Taylor & Francis.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Brookes, A. (2018). Preventing fatal incidents in school and youth group camps and excursions: Understanding the unthinkable. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Carter, P. (1987). The road to Botany Bay: An essay in spatial history. London: Faber and Faber.Google Scholar
  20. Cathcart, M. (2009). The water dreamers: The remarkable history of our dry country. Melbourne, Australia: Text Publishing.Google Scholar
  21. Clark, I. D., & Cahir, D. A. (2004). Tanderrum ‘Freedom of the Bush’: The Djadjawurrung presence on the goldfields of Central Victoria. Castlemaine, Australia: Friends of the Mount Alexander Diggings.Google Scholar
  22. Clode, D. (2006). As if for a thousand years: A history of Victoria’s land conservation and environment conservation councils. Melbourne, Australia: Victoria Environment Conservation Council.Google Scholar
  23. Colebrook, C. (2002). Gilles Deleuze. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Crozier, M. (1999). Antipodean sensibilities. The South Atlantic Quarterly, 98(4), 839–859.Google Scholar
  25. Deleuze, G., & Guattari, F. (1987). A thousand plateaus: Capitalism and schizophrenia (B. Massumi, Trans.). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  26. Egan, K. (2005). An imaginative approach to education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  27. Egan, K. (2010). Culture, imagination, and the development of the mind. In T. W. Nielsen, R. Fitzgerald, & M. Fettes (Eds.), Imagination in education theory and practice: A many-sided vision (pp. 21–41). Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  28. Egan, K., & Nadaner, D. (1988). Introduction. In K. Egan & D. Nadaner (Eds.), Imagination and education (pp. ix–xv). Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Environment Conservation Council. (2001). Box-Ironbark forests and woodlands investigation: Final report. East Melbourne, Australia: Environment Conservation Council.Google Scholar
  30. Fauchery, A. (1965 [1857]). Letters from a miner in Australia (A. R. Chisholm, Trans.). Melbourne, Australia: Georgian House.Google Scholar
  31. Fettes, M., Nielsen, T. W., Haralambous, B., & Fitzgerald, R. (2010). Introduction. In T. W. Nielsen, R. Fitzgerald, & M. Fettes (Eds.), Imagination in education theory and practice: A many-sided vision (pp. 1–20). Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  32. Fine, G. A. (1998). Morel tales: The culture of mushrooming. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Garden, D. (2001). Catalyst or cataclysm? Gold mining and the environment. Victorian Historical Journal, 72(1–2), 28–44.Google Scholar
  34. Gough, N. (2011). From the Bronx to Bengifunda (and other lines of flight): Deterritorializing purposes and methods in science education research. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 6, 113–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Greene, M. (1988). What happened to imagination? In K. Egan & D. Nadaner (Eds.), Imagination and education (pp. 45–55). Milton Keynes, UK: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts and social change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.Google Scholar
  37. Griffiths, T. (Ed.). (1987). The life and adventures of Edward Snell: The illustrated diary of an artist, engineer and adventurer in the Australian colonies 1849 to 1859. North Ryde, Australia: Angus & Robertson and The Library Council of Victoria.Google Scholar
  38. Griffiths, T. (1991). History and natural history: Conservation movement in conflict? In D. J. Mulvaney (Ed.), The humanities and the Australian environment: Papers from the Australian academy of the humanities symposium, 1990 (pp. 87–109). Canberra, Australia: Australian Academy of the Humanities.Google Scholar
  39. Griffiths, T. (1996). Hunters and collectors: The antiquarian imagination in Australia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  40. Griffiths, T. (2003). The nature of culture and the culture of nature. In H. M. Teo & R. White (Eds.), Cultural history in Australia (pp. 67–80). Sydney, Australia: UNSW Press.Google Scholar
  41. Harper, M. (2007). The ways of the bushwalker: On foot in Australia. Sydney, Australia: UNSW Press.Google Scholar
  42. Heath, G. (2008). Exploring the imagination to establish frameworks for learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 27, 115–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Hocking, G. (1994). Castlemaine: From camp to city 1835–1900, a pictorial history of Forest Creek and Mount Alexander goldfields. Knoxfield, Australia: Five Mile Press.Google Scholar
  44. Howitt, W. (1855[1972]). Land, labour and gold: Or two years in Victoria with visits to Sydney and van Diemen’s Land. Kilmore, Australia: Lowden.Google Scholar
  45. Jenkins, J. (1977). Diary of a Welsh swagman. South Melbourne, Australia: Sun Books.Google Scholar
  46. Lennon, J. (1997). Case study of the cultural landscapes of the Central Victorian goldfields. In Australia: State of the environment technical paper series (Natural & cultural heritage). Canberra, Australia: Department of Environment.Google Scholar
  47. Lennon, J. (2000). Victorian goldfields: Tentative world heritage listing. The Historic Environment, 14(5), 70–74.Google Scholar
  48. Lorraine, T. (2010). Lines of flight. In A. Parr (Ed.), The Deleuze dictionary: Revised edition (2nd ed., pp. 147–148). Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Mount Alexander Diggings Committee. (1999). Discovering the Mount Alexander Diggings. Castlemaine, Australia: Mount Alexander Diggings Committee.Google Scholar
  50. Moyal, A. (2001). Platypus: The extraordinary story of how a curious creature baffled the world. Crows Nest, Australia: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  51. National Parks and Wildlife Service, N. S. W. (1999). Threatened species information: Brush-tailed Phascogale. Retrieved from http://www.fnpw.com.au/enews4/brushtailed_phascogale.pdf
  52. Nielsen, T. W., Fitzgerald, R., & Fettes, M. (Eds.). (2010). Imagination in education theory and practice: A many-sided vision. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  53. Payne, P. (2010). Remarkable-tracking, experiential education of the ecological imagination. Environmental Education Research, 16(3–4), 295–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Payne, P., & Wattchow, B. (2009). Phenomenogoical deconstruction, slow pedagogy, and the corporeal turn in wild environmental/outdoor education. Canadian Journal of Education, 14, 15–32.Google Scholar
  55. Pearson, M., Lennon, J., & Marshall, D. (2002). Heritage action plan: Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park. Retrieved from.Google Scholar
  56. Pitts, W. (2011). Potentialities beyond deficit perspectives: Globalization, culture and urban science education in the Bronx. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 6(1), 89–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Roberts, D. A. (2006). ‘They would speedily abandon the country to new comers’: The denial of Aboriginal rights. In M. Crotty & D. A. Roberts (Eds.), The great mistakes of Australian history (pp. 14–31). Sydney, Australia: UNSW Press.Google Scholar
  58. Roy, K. (2003). Teachers in nomadic spaces: Deleuze and curriculum. New York: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  59. Schama, S. (1995). Landscape and memory. London: Fontana Press.Google Scholar
  60. Sinclair, P. (2001). The Murray: A river and its people. Carlton South, Australia: Melbourne University Press.Google Scholar
  61. Slattery, B., Ralph, D., & Slattery, D. (2008). Vagabond: The story of Charles Sanger. Castlemaine, Australia: Friends of the Box Ironbark Forests.Google Scholar
  62. Strahan, R. (Ed.). (1983). The Australian Museum complete book of Australian mammals. Sydney, Australia: Angus & Robertson Publishers.Google Scholar
  63. Tonkin, R. (1999). To the goldfields. St Leonards, Australia: Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationLa Trobe UniversityBendigoAustralia

Personalised recommendations