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A Rhizomatic Context for Australian Outdoor Environmental Education

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Part of the International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education book series (IEOEE)

Abstract

This plateau employs Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s (A thousand plateaus: capitalism and schizophrenia (B. Massumi, Trans.). University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1897) concept of the rhizome to map the contexts that have shaped and informed my approach to place-responsive outdoor environmental education. This rhizome consists of a series of nodes that emerge in subsequent plateaus of the book, and include: Australian IS different – the bio-physical attributes of the continent; on borrowed time – on the declining ecological health of some Australian environments; thinking differently about Australian natural~cutural history; and, rejection of universalist approaches to outdoor environmental education.

Keywords

Australian natural history Cultural history Place Rhizo-context Outdoor environmental education 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationLa Trobe UniversityBendigoAustralia

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