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Measuring and Monitoring Local Government Performance

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Abstract

This chapter argues that disappointing results in local government performance and accountability may be attributable to a lack of progress in citizen empowerment to hold governments accountable in between elections as a median voter lacks the information to evaluate government performance and hold it to account. This chapter highlights widely used mandatory and voluntary approaches to measure and monitor local government performance. It also develops a hybrid theory and practice approach on local government accountability and discusses implementation methods and processes of this approach. This is followed by highlighting real-world examples of better as well as not-so-good practices in local government performance accountability. A concluding section draws general lessons from these experiences.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of BusinessUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsTrent UniversityPeterboroughCanada
  3. 3.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  4. 4.Governance StudiesBrookings InstitutionWashington, DCUSA

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