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Cuba and the Imperial Solution

  • Rick Rodriguez
Chapter
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Part of the Pivotal Studies in the Global American Literary Imagination book series (PSGALI)

Abstract

This chapter reads U.S. plans to acquire Cuba as an immunitary response to mounting conflicts between North and South. A critical analysis of literary works about the possible annexation of the island reveals anxieties that the expansionist solution would simply intensify the nature of the contest over national sovereignty.

Keywords

Cuba Lucy Holcombe Pickens Mary Peabody Mann Filibustering U.S. Civil War Empire Immunity 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rick Rodriguez
    • 1
  1. 1.Baruch CollegeNew York CityUSA

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