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Multinationals from Russia and Turkey

  • Andreas BreinbauerEmail author
  • Johannes Leitner
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  • 212 Downloads

Abstract

As of December 2018, Austria was home to 377 headquarters or regional headquarters of multinational companies. The majority of these headquarters belong to multinationals based in developed economies, such as Germany, Italy, the USA, or and Japan. However, a growing number of investments originate from firms which are referred to as “emerging market multinationals”. This chapter takes a closer look into Turkey and Russia, and asks, how Austria is perceived as a business location by managers from these two countries. Based on qualitative Interviews, the results show that Turkish and Russian managers have a rather detrimental view of Austria.

While Turkish investors prefer to target markets around Austria, such as Germany, France, or Switzerland, Russian managers appreciate the political stability in Austria, its traditional and well-established relations with Russia, and Austria as a hub for accessing both Western Europe and Central and Eastern Europe.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Applied Sciences BFI ViennaViennaAustria

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