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A Normative Framework

  • Kiarash Aramesh
Chapter
  • 80 Downloads
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 15)

Abstract

This chapter answers the central question of this book. The fifth chapter starts with providing a review of the existing approaches. Afterward, it presents the suggested ethical framework for Global Governance for Health Research. This ethical framework has three main elements: First, a background of personal and subjective virtues that are the merging points of the traditional masculine and modern feminist accounts of virtue ethics; second, a core of principles mainly from the UNESCO Universal Declaration of Bioethics and Human Rights combined with the systematic framework that is named the NIH framework; and third, a place for situation ethics embodied in the crucial role of Research Ethics Committees and Institutional Review Boards composed of well-trained experts and lay-persons from all the involved parties and communities.

Keywords

Principlism Research ethics Virtue ethics Situation ethics Ethical framework Institutional review board 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiarash Aramesh
    • 1
  1. 1.Edinboro University of PennsylvaniaEdinboroUSA

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