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AEsOP: Applied Engagement for Community Participation

  • Paul HancockEmail author
  • Helen Gibson
  • Babak Akhgar
Chapter
  • 216 Downloads
Part of the Security Informatics and Law Enforcement book series (SILE)

Abstract

AEsOP (Applied Engagement for Community Participation) is a serious game that was developed as part of a study to examine whether interactive video games can have a quantifiable positive impact on levels of civic engagement with public authorities. The game was created with the objective of providing a tool that can be used to engage with communities including those that traditionally are underrepresented, lack ‘voice’ or feel underacknowledged by police and perhaps where trust relationships with public authorities may need improvement. The game was thus developed with a double focus: as engagement tool as well as a setting for research. This chapter discusses the conceptual thinking that went into the game as well as how the practical challenge of improving community-police relationships informed the design of the game.

Keywords

Serious games Community policing Community engagement Citizen participation Crime prevention Trust 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CENTRIC, Sheffield Hallam UniversitySheffieldUK

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