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Soft Power pp 23-83 | Cite as

Power in International Relations: Understandings and Varieties

  • Hendrik W. Ohnesorge
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Part of the Global Power Shift book series (GLOBAL)

Abstract

In this chapter, the author first addresses the centrality and complexity of the phenomenon of power in international relations. Starting from definitional approximations to the five-letter word, he discusses various conceptions of power and identifies its different varieties. In doing so, he subscribes to the established dichotomy of hard and soft power in international affairs today. Furthermore, the relational and contextual nature of power are established and different approaches to its measurement explored.

In the chapter’s second major part, the author addresses the notion of soft power. To that end, he explores the terminological origins of the concept and reveals its deep historical roots, which can be traced back to classical writings in Chinese as well as Western philosophical and political thought. Subsequently, the author discusses the ways the forces of attraction take effect in international relations and examines the concept against the backdrop of International Relations theories, crucially emphasizing its non-normative nature. Finally, the chapter addresses major points of criticism directed toward the concept of soft power.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hendrik W. Ohnesorge
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Global StudiesUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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