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Basic Properties of Nitrous Oxide Gas

  • Amit SethiEmail author
  • Sumati Bhalla
  • Kunal Gupta
Chapter
  • 246 Downloads

Abstract

It is said that “understanding is deeper than knowledge.” Likewise, there will be many of us who know nitrous oxide or are familiar with it, but few who understand it. This chapter will try to bridge the gap between our knowledge and understanding. After a brief look at the history and process of manufacturing and properties of the gas, we will introduce our readers to the pharmacology of the gas. We will learn the science behind some of the properties of the gas (such as quick onset and recovery) which make it perhaps a safe anxiolytic agent to be used in our offices. The readers will also gain a better insight into systemic effects of the gas and well known phenomenon like diffusion hypoxia and concentration effect. In the end, the authors discuss what a “normal recovery” from nitrous oxide sedation should look like and what factors can affect it.

Keywords

Manufacturing of nitrous oxide Storage and handling of nitrous oxide Pharmacology of nitrous oxide Blood gas partition coefficient/solubility of nitrous oxide Diffusion hypoxia with nitrous oxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryHenry Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.The Airport Dental CenterOshawaCanada
  3. 3.Children’s Dental CenterGurugramIndia

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