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A Look Behind the Curtain: Standardization Education for Engineers from the Electric Vehicle Standardization Shopfloor

  • Peter Van den BosscheEmail author
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Part of the CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance book series (CSEG)

Abstract

Building a challenging curriculum for future engineers in a changing technological landscape is one of the missions of the BRUFACE master programme in engineering, offered by Brussels Universities. The Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)’s long tradition in electric vehicle research, which strongly feeds back into the education programme and its involvement in international standardization for electric vehicles has created the opportunity for a specific course called Automotive standardization. The aim of this course is to introduce students to standardization and to give a state-of-the-art update of standards and standardization in the field of the electrically propelled vehicle, a technology which is now globally emerging and where international standardization is very active. The specificity of this course are the practical exercises, where students analyze the genesis of a specific standard as a case study, offering unique insights in the dynamics of standard development. The paper analyzes the background and development of standardization education at the VUB and the experiences with the chosen approach.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vrije Universiteit BrusselBrusselBelgium

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