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Conclusions—Making Greater Miami’s Communities Nutrition Resilient

  • Franziska Alesso-Bendisch
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Climate Resilient Societies book series (PSCRS)

Abstract

This final chapter provides recommendations on how to strengthen community nutrition resilience in Greater Miami. Based on interviews, literature review, and case study research, it offers actionable ideas in two areas: (1) planning and policy and (2) strengthening the food system. Several steps are identified to assign clear responsibility and focus on the issue, conduct robust assessments of critical communities on which to focus, and create the business case for multi-sectorial action. Recommendations are then made for the process of strengthening the food system, particularly increasing health literacy and cultural relevance of food for an increased uptake of healthy food options. Finally, it offers a vision for Greater Miami as a center of excellence for resilience and offers areas for future research.

Keywords

Greater Miami Community nutrition resilience planning and policy Food policy council Strengthen the food system Cultural relevance 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franziska Alesso-Bendisch
    • 1
  1. 1.Well Life VenturesMiami BeachUSA

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