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Going Global: Education As a Global Common Good

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Abstract

By examining the literature on global governance theory, and its application to the field of education, this chapter revisits normative principles for the global governance of education. It focuses in particular on global education policy discourse and examines the concept of education as a global public good as it has been referred to by some of the main international actors such as the UNDP and the World Bank. Considering the limits of the framework of global public goods, this study discusses the extent to which the principle of education as a global common good may orientate the global governance of education with a view to revisiting existing hierarchies of power within global structures and strengthening more democratic processes at a global level.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Research Centre on Global Citizenship EducationUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly

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